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Total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) concentration in the water column

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  • This dataset contains visual and physical analyses of the impacts of ocean acidification on the skeletons of the cold-water coral <em>Lophelia pertusa</em>. Visual analysis includes synchrotron images from the Diamond Light Source and electron back scatter diffraction images on polished coral skeletons. Physical analyses include Raman spectroscopy data. Skeletal samples analysed were from the Southern California Bight (SCB), USA, and the Mingulay Reef Complex (MRC), UK. SCB samples were collected in 2010, 2014 and 2015. MRC samples were collected in 2012. Samples from the SCB were taken using a ROV at varying depths covering an environmental gradient with respect to aragonite saturation. Each sample represents an aggregation of <em>Lophelia pertusa</em> that was sampled with a basket attached to the ROV. The samples were transported to the surface and subsampled for live, ethanol preserved, frozen, and dried samples. Carbonate chemistry parameters of the water column were collected at the same time using a CTD and include temperature, salinity, oxygen, DIC, pH, and total alkalinity. Coral samples from the MRC were subjected to long term experimentation in projected future conditions. The conditions for MRC samples are outlined in Hennige et al. 2015. The coral samples were also analysed using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and these images are held at BODC and can be requested through this record. RAMAN spectroscopy and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis was also used to further examine the corals under future projections of climate change. Ocean acidification is a threat to cold-water coral reefs in terms of dissolution to their skeletons, and their subsequent structural stability. This will likely determine the stability of the habitats they form. Work in the Southern California Bight was funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. The study was supported by Diamond Light Source (DLS) experimental campaigns MT19794 and MT20412. This work was supported by an Independent Research Fellowship from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to Sebastian Hennige (NE/K009028/1 and NE/K009028/2) and the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland), funded by the Scottish Funding Council (grant reference HR09011) and contributing institutions. Experimental incubations for N. Atlantic corals were supported by the UK Ocean Acidification programme (NE/H017305/1 awarded to John Murray Roberts). Imaging analysis by Uwe Wolfram and Alexander Groetsch were supported by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) of the UK under grant number EP/P005756/1.

  • Dataset was collated from surveys in the west side of Vavvaru Island, Lhaviyani Atoll, Maldives. The data were collected as a series of triplicate 25 m x 2 m transecs parallel to shore, at three locations on the reef flat: near (70 m from the shore), mid (140 m from the shore) and far (210 m from the shore). All locations were at similar depths of 1 m. This took place during March 2015. Along each transect the number and size of all coralliths and total number of non-free living individuals were recorded, alongside with several environmental parameters (Water Temperature, Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR), Total Alkalinity, Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Dissolved Oxygen). Abundance and size of coralliths was recorded through non-invasive techniques and the environmental parameters were obtained through multiple instruments: Fluorometer, Oxygen sensor, spectrophotometry, Titration and a PAR logger. The aim was to examine whether corals have the capacity to create their own stable habitat through 'free-living stabilisation'. The work was supported by an Independent Research Fellowship from NERC to Sebastian Hennige (NE/K009028/1; NE/K009028/2), an Independent Research Fellowship from the Marine Alliance for Science & Technology for Scotland to Heidi Burnett, an Independent Research Fellowship from the Royal Society of Edinburgh / Scottish Government (RSE 48701/1) and NERC (NE/H010025) to Nick Kamenos, a Gilchrist Fieldwork Award to Heidi Burnett, Sebastian Hennige and Nick Kamenos by the Gilchrist Educational Trust, administered by the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), and a Research Incentive Grant from the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland to Heidi Burnett, Sebastian Hennige and Nick Kamenos (grant # 70013). Field sampling was under permission from the Maldives Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture ((OTHR) 30-D/lNDIV/2015).

  • This datasets contains a box model of the atmosphere‐ocean to understand surface warming response and explain how surface warming varies in time with carbon emissions. The box model consists of three homogeneous layers: a well‐mixed atmosphere, an ocean mixed layer with 100‐m thickness, and an ocean interior with 3,900‐m thickness, all assumed to have the same horizontal area. The model solves for the heat and carbon exchange between these layers, including physical and chemical transfers, but ignoring biological transfers, and sediment and weathering interactions. The model is forced from an equilibrium by carbon emitted into the atmosphere with a constant rate of 20 PgC/year for 100 years and integrated for 1,000 years. Ocean ventilation is represented by the ocean interior taking up the heat and carbon properties of the mixed layer on an e-folding time scale of 200 years. The model was generated as part of Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Discovery Science project “Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake” standard grant reference NE/N009789/1 lead by Principal Investigator Professor Ric Williams.Model code and associated metadata are held in the archives at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Other datasets generated by this grant are discoverable via EDMED 6712.

  • The RAPID-AMOC (Rapid Climate Change - Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation) data set consists of pressure, current velocities, temperature, salinity, density, oxygen, alkalinity, pH, PCO2 and inorganic carbon time series. Measurements are collected by moored instruments deployed in arrays across the Atlantic at approximately 26.5N for the Monitoring the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at 26.5N (MOC) project and the Atlantic BiogeoChemical Fluxes (ABC Fluxes) project. The data set also consists of conductivity- temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, and ships' underway monitoring system meteorology and surface hydrography collected during the mooring deployment and servicing cruises. The RAPID-AMOC data set follows on from the original Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) Programme oceanographic dataset and the RAPID-WATCH dataset. It spans data collected from 2015 to the present and is intended to continue to collect data until approximately 2020. The main aims of the RAPID-AMOC Programme are to provide oceanographic measurements that continue the long time series of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation to be derived for use in climate change research. The MOC and ABC Fluxes projects are led by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton.

  • The RAPID-AMOC (Rapid Climate Change - Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation) data set consists of pressure, current velocities, temperature, salinity, density, oxygen, alkalinity, pH, PCO2 and inorganic carbon time series. Measurements are collected by moored instruments deployed in arrays across the Atlantic at approximately 26.5N for the Monitoring the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at 26.5N (MOC) project and the Atlantic BiogeoChemical Fluxes (ABC Fluxes) project. The data set also consists of conductivity- temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, and ships' underway monitoring system meteorology and surface hydrography collected during the mooring deployment and servicing cruises. The RAPID-AMOC data set follows on from the original Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) Programme oceanographic dataset and the RAPID-WATCH dataset. It spans data collected from 2015 to the present and is intended to continue to collect data until approximately 2020. The main aims of the RAPID-AMOC Programme are to provide oceanographic measurements that continue the long time series of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation to be derived for use in climate change research. The MOC and ABC Fluxes projects are led by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton.

  • This dataset contains derived annual mean globally averaged variables from an existing global coupled carbon-climate Earth System Model and a novel atmosphere-ocean box model to understand surface warming response in terms of changes in global carbon inventories, empirical heat budget, and variation in time with carbon emissions. The source model outputs were generated by Thomas Froelicher in 2015 using a 1000-year simulation of the global coupled carbon-climate Earth System Model developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL ESM2M). A scenario was forced of a 1% annual rate increase in carbon dioxide from preindustrial levels until global mean surface air temperature increased by 2 degrees Celsius since the preindustrial, after this point emissions of carbon were set to zero and all other non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases were kept at preindustrial levels. Output parameters included: ocean temperature; salinity; dissolved inorganic carbon; ocean alkalinity; dissolved inorganic phosphate; surface air temperature; atmospheric carbon dioxide and cumulative carbon emission. Annual mean variables were then derived from these data. This was determined by calculated changes in: ocean carbon inventory; ocean carbon under saturation; saturated dissolved inorganic carbon; ocean dissolved inorganic carbon; radiative forcing from carbon dioxide; and ocean heat uptake. Additionally the dependence of radiative forcing on carbon emissions, dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing and surface warming dependence on radiative forcing were determined. The box model consists of three homogeneous layers: a well‐mixed atmosphere; an ocean mixed layer with 100‐m thickness; and an ocean interior with 3,900‐m thickness, all assumed to have the same horizontal area. The model solves for the heat and carbon exchange between these layers, including physical and chemical transfers, however ignoring biological transfers, and sediment and weathering interactions. The model is forced from an equilibrium by carbon emitted into the atmosphere with a constant rate of 20 PgC/year for 100 years and integrated for 1,000 years. Ocean ventilation is represented by the ocean interior taking up the heat and carbon properties of the mixed layer on an e-folding time scale of 200 years. These datasets were generated as part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Discovery Science project “Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake” standard grant reference NE/N009789/1 lead by Principal Investigator - Professor Ric Williams, University of Liverpool and Co-Investigator - Dr Philip Goodwin, University of Southampton. Data are acrvhived at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • This dataset contains hydrographic profiles (temperature, salinity, oxygen, fluorometer, transmissometer, irradiance) and along track measurements (bathymetry, surface meteorology, sea surface hydrography), with discrete measurements including water chemistry (organic and inorganic nutrients, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, dissolved gases, trace metals) collected from a hydrographic section in the North Atlantic Ocean. This hydrographic section, designated A05 by the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), runs along a nominal latitude of 24.5N between Florida and either Spain, North Africa, Portugal or the Canary Islands. Four UK cruises (D279, D346, DY040 and JC191) have contributed to this dataset to date using CTD casts, vessel-mounted and lowered ADCPs, bottle sampling and meteorological measuring systems to collect data. The measurements were collected as one of the UK's contributions to the Global Ocean Ship-based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP) and with the aim of contributing to the study of decadal variability of the present ocean circulation and meridional transport of heat, freshwater and biogeochemistry, as part of the Climate Linked Atlantic Sector Science (CLASS) project. The work was led by teams from the National Oceanography Centre at Southampton. Data from the section are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC).

  • The Catlin Arctic Survey created a unique collaboration between scientists and explorers to undertake field research in the Arctic. Each Catlin Survey comprised of two principle parts. The 'Catlin Ice Base', which was a stationary scientific research base located off the northern coast of Canada; and the 'Explorer Team', comprising of a small long-range specialist team moving on foot from close to the North Geographic Pole towards Greenland. The Catlin Ice Base consisted of temporary polar shelters and tents erected on the sea ice off the coast of Ellef Ringnes Island, Nunavut, Canada, 78°46'27" N / 104°42'49" W. In 2010 and 2011 during the second and third Catlin Arctic Surveys, scientists and explorers examined the upper layers of the Arctic Ocean's water column. In parallel, scientists from the US, UK and Canada conducted experiments at a unique research station on the frozen Arctic Ocean with the support of experienced polar explorers and guides. These datasets (as .xls and .csv files) resulted from the work carried out at the Ice Base. Here a group, of up to 10 scientists and operational staff, were able to collect and analyze samples from under the sea ice as well as deploy heavier instrumentation up to a depth of 200 metres. Scientists at the ice base made measurements of temperature, salinity, total alkalinity, DIC, nutrients, chlorophyll, zooplankton community structure and physiological responses to elevated pCO2 levels. The Catlin Arctic Survey has enabled the monitoring, measuring and collection of information to improve scientific understanding of the processes involved in, and the impacts of, climate change. The scientists researched how changes within the seawater beneath the floating sea ice may be affecting powerful ocean currents that influence prevailing climate and weather patterns worldwide. These data were collected as part of the Catlin Arctic Survey funded by Catlin Ltd. and coordinated by Geo Mission Ltd. Participants were supported by a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) UK Fellowship, PML Lord Kingsland Fellowship, Ralph Brown Expedition Grant from the Royal Geographical Society, NERC's National Centre for Earth Observation, World Wildlife Fund for Nature and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

  • The data set comprises those data collected on UK World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) cruises. The cruises completed to date have collected data either in the North Atlantic (RRS Charles Darwin 58, 59, 62, 62a, 68 and 78; RRS Discovery 223, 230 and 233) or in the Southern Ocean (RRS Discovery 199, 200, 201, 207, 213 and 214; RRS James Clark Ross 0a, 0b, 10, 16 and 27). Conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data are held from all 20 cruises. 14 out of the 16 shipborne acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data sets are held, those from RRS Discovery 230 and RRS James Clark Ross 0b are still to be received. 4 out of the 6 lowered ADCP data sets are held, those from RRS Discovery 230 and 233 are still to be received. 3 out of the 4 SeaSoar data sets are held, with that from RRS Discovery 223 still to be received. 12 out of 13 eXpendable BathyThermograph (XBT) data sets are held, with that from RRS James Clark Ross 0a still awaited. All main water bottle data sets have been received apart from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) tracer data from RRS Discovery 223, 230 and 233. All of the main underway data sets thermosalinograph, meteorology, etc.) are held apart from thermosalinograph data from RRS James Clark Ross 0b.

  • The data set comprises hydrographic and biogeochemical and biological measurements including temperature, salinity, currents, chlorophyll, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen, suspended matter concentrations, nutrients, plankton and fish. The results of primary production experiments are also included. The data were collected from the Bristol Channel, Severn Estuary, Celtic Sea and Plymouth Sound between 1971 and 1983. Measurements were taken over a series of more than 100 cruises, many with more than 50 stations. The most intensive sampling took place before 1975. The original data were collated and stored at Institute for Marine Environmental Research (IMER), which became Plymouth Marine Laboratory in 1988. As this is a large and important data set, which was previously held in an inaccessible format, it was selected for long-term archival at BODC as part of the NERC SEEDCORN programme. The data have been extracted, loaded into a relational database and are available on CD-ROM.