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  • A dataset of trace metal concentrations (As, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in indoor dust from homes from 11 countries, along with a suite of potentially contributory residential characteristics. A household vacuum dust sample, collected by the study participant using their regular vacuum cleaner, was submitted to the laboratory for analysis by X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) on the <250um sieved fraction, along with the completion of an online questionnaire survey. Dust sample collection took place between 2018 – 2021. The Home Biome project is affiliated to the DustSafe community science programme (see mapmyenvironment.com). Sample location data are provided at town/city and Country level. Health risk from exposure to potentially contaminant-laden dust has been widely reported. Given the amount of time people spend indoors, residential environments are an important but understudied environment with respect to human exposure to contaminants. Indeed, the nature of the hazard that house dust presents remains poorly characterized. These data will be of interest to those interested in human exposure to potentially toxic elements and environmental health, as well as to the participants, who received a bespoke report on their sample data and information on key sources and ways to reduce exposure to trace elements in indoor dust.

  • Analysed trace element data and radiocarbon data from five existing marine sediment cores from the NE Pacific margin (45-50N) that intersects the major water masses of the N Pacific, from a depth transect (700-3300m)

  • Major and trace element data for olivine- and plagioclase-hosted silicate melt inclusions, their host minerals, and associated matrix glasses, from Midfell, Snaefellsjokull and Oraefajokull, Iceland. Melt inclusion compositions are provided as measured, and corrected for post-entrapment crystallization. Reflected light images of the melt inclusions.

  • Major and trace element composition, and stable isotope data for whole-rock samples from alkaline rocks of the Chilwa Province. Samples collected between 2011-2021 in the Chilwa Alkaline Province, Malawi

  • The data set presents major and trace element geochemical data obtained from ICP-MS measurements on micro-drilled subsamples of ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts from Tropic Seamount, north-east Atlantic Ocean. The data represent detailed stratigraphic analysis of Fe-Mn crust samples 078_019 and 085_004. These samples were collected at 3100 and 1100 meters beneath sea level, respectively, during the JC142 expedition of the RRS James Cook for the MarineE-Tech project in 2016.

  • A dataset of airborne particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) readings (every 3 minutes) collected by participating households in Northeast England in their kitchens and living rooms over the course of one week, along with data from a linked questionnaire survey and metal(oid)s data from a corresponding household vacuum dust sample collected by the study participant. Matched air monitoring and dust sample collection took place between June 2020 and August 2021. We increasingly spend time indoors and household air pollution results in an estimated 4.25 million premature deaths globally each year. The majority of these deaths are associated with fine particulate matter (PM), or dust. Exposure to PM can initiate or enhance disease in humans, yet the nature of the hazard that house dust presents remains poorly characterized. The data was collected to provide concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 in a range of Northeast England households and concentrations of metal(oid)s in their house dust. It will be of interest to those interested in human exposure to potentially toxic elements and environmental health. We used factory calibrated Aeroqual 500 units for PM monitoring. Metal(oid)s data were generated using a SPECTROSCOUT X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer on the <250um sieved fraction of household vacuum dust. This dataset was part of NERC Grant NE/T004401/1.

  • Major and trace element data of lava and tephra samples from the 2021 Tajogaite eruption. Major and select trace element collected by XRF, trace elements collected by ICPMS, both at the University of Granada. Data collected as part of NERC Urgency Grant led by K Chamberlain (Liverpool), in collaboration with M Pankhurst (INVOLCAN), J Scarrow (Granada), D Morgan (Leeds), J Hickey (Exeter), D Neave (Manchester), for understanding how eruptions begin, evolve and end. Samples analysed span the entire September - December 2021 eruptive sequence of Tajogaite, and data were collected between December 2021 and August 2022.

  • This dataset was acquired as part of a NERC-funded Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) PhD Studentship at the University of Leicester and British Geological Survey between 2014-2018 [grant no. NE/L002493/1] (see also Emmings, 2018 unpublished PhD thesis). This research was conducted within the Central England NERC Training Alliance (CENTA) consortium. This dataset accompanies a manuscript titled "Late Palaeozoic Phytoplankton Blackout: A 100 Myr Record of Enhanced Primary Productivity". Co-authors and co-workers were: Joseph F. Emmings (University of Leicester, British Geological Survey); Sarah J. Davies (University of Leicester); Simon W. Poulton (University of Leeds); Michael H. Stephenson (British Geological Survey); Gawen R. T. Jenkin (University of Leicester); Christopher H. Vane (British Geological Survey); Melanie J. Leng (British Geological Survey, University of Nottingham) and Vicky Moss-Hayes (British Geological Survey). Nick Riley (Carboniferous Ltd) is thanked for sharing biostratigraphic expertise and assistance. Nick Marsh and Tom Knott are thanked for providing assistance during geochemical analyses. This dataset contains the following data (in Microsoft Excel format). 1) Fe species abundance data measured at the University of Leeds using the sequential extraction method of Poulton and Canfield (2005) and pyrite S extraction method of Canfield et al., (1986); 2) Total Fe, Si, Mn and Al major element concentrations (measured using x-ray fluorescence at the University of Leicester; XRF); 3) Total organic carbon (TOC) and inorganic C (MINC) data measured via Rock-Eval pyrolysis at the British Geological Survey; 4) Cu, Mo and U trace element concentration data (measured via XRF at the University of Leicester) and enrichment factors relative to Post-Archaean Average Shale (PAAS; Taylor and McLennan, 1985). Analyses were coupled on 99 sample powders from three positions in the Craven Basin and spanning ammonoid biozones P2c-d to E1c1. See also http://dx.doi.org/10.5285/9ceadcad-a93c-4bab-8ca1-07b0de2c5ed0 for additional sedimentological and geochemical data from Hind Clough, MHD4 and Cominco S9. These data were also interpreted together with 20 drill-core samples previously acquired from Hind Clough (‘HC01’ prefix). See http://dx.doi.org/10.5285/c39a32b2-1a30-4426-8389-2fae21ec60ad for further information regarding this drill-core dataset. References: Emmings, J. 2018. Controls on UK Lower Namurian Shale Gas Prospectivity: Understanding the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Organic Matter in Siliciclastic Mudstones. Unpublished PhD Thesis. University of Leicester. Poulton, S. W. & Canfield, D. E. 2005. Development of a sequential extraction procedure for iron: implications for iron partitioning in continentally derived particulates. Chemical Geology 214, 209-221, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2004.09.003. Canfield D., Raiswell R., Westrich J., Reaves CM, Berner RA. 1986. The use of chromium reduction in the analysis of reduced inorganic sulfur in sediments and shales. Chemical Geology, 54(1): 149-155. Taylor S, McLennan S. 1985. The Continental Crust: Its Composition and Evolution. Blackwell Scientific: London.

  • The <250um fraction of 28 household vacuum dust samples were extracted using high throughput isolation of microbial genomic DNA (21 samples from a national campaign within the UK and 7 samples from Greece, providing samples from two contrasting bioclimatic zones). Both positive and negative reagent controls were included to ensure sterility throughout the processing and sequencing steps, and a randomly selected sample was run in triplicate (DSUK179). These data (raw fastq files: Target_gene 16S and Target_subfragment V4) are available from the European Nucleotide Archive via the study accession PRJEB46920 with individual sample accession numbers ERX6130460 to ERX6130493; https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/browser/view/PRJEB46920). A wide range of anthropogenic factors are likely to affect the indoor microbiome and to capture some of this heterogeneity participants were asked to complete a questionnaire. In addition, trace element data were generated using an X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry on the <250um sieved fraction of the household vacuum dust. Sample location data are provided at town/city, Country level. Indoor dust serves as a reservoir for environmental exposure to microbial communities, many of which are benign, some are beneficial, whilst some exhibit pathogenicity. Whilst non-occupational exposure to a range of trace elements and organic contaminants in house dust are a known risk factor for a range of diseases and poor health outcomes, we know far less about the microbial communities associated with our indoor home environments, and their interaction/impacts on human health. Our knowledge of indoor residential bacterial biodiversity, biogeography and their associated drivers are still poorly understood. The data were collected to improve our understanding of the home microbiome.

  • Laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS analyses of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Fuego volcano, Guatemala eruptions on the 14th, 17th and 23rd October, 1974. Full descriptions regarding the analysed samples are given in Rose et al. (1978) and Lloyd et al. (2013). References Lloyd, A.S., Plank, T., Ruprecht, P., Hauri, E.H. and Rose, W. (2013) Volatile loss from melt inclusions in pyroclasts of differing sizes. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology 165, 129-153. Rose, W.I., Anderson, A.T., Woodruff, L.G. and Bonis, S.B. (1978) The October 1974 basaltic tephra from Fuego volcano: Description and history of the magma body. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 4, 3-53.