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Wheat

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  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Modelled average percentage yield loss due to ground-level ozone pollution (per 1 degree by 1 degree grid cell) are presented for the crops maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa), soybean (Glycine max) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) for the period 2010-2012. Data are on a global scale, based on the distribution of production for each crop, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation’s (FAO) Global Agro-Ecological Zones (GAEZ) crop production data for the year 2000. Modelled ozone data (2010-2012) needed for yield loss calculations were derived from the EMEP MSC-W (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, Meteorological Synthesising Centre-West) chemical transport model (version 4.16). Mapping the global crop yield losses due to ozone highlights the impact of ozone on crops and allows areas at high risk of ozone damage to be identified, which is one of the first steps towards mitigation of the problem. The yield loss calculations were done as part of the NERC funded SUNRISE project (NEC06476). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/181a7dd5-0fd4-482a-afce-0fa6875b5fb3

  • Modelled annual average production loss (thousand tonnes per 1 degree by 1 degree grid cell) due to ground-level ozone pollution is presented for the crops maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa), soybean (Glycine max) and wheat (Triticum aestivum), for the period 2010-2012. Data are on a global scale, based on the distribution of production for each crop, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation’s (FAO) Global Agro-Ecological Zones (GAEZ) crop production data for the year 2000. Modelled ozone data (2010-2012) needed for production loss calculations were derived from the EMEP MSC-W (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, Meteorological Synthesising Centre-West) chemical transport model (version 4.16). Mapping the global crop production losses due to ozone highlights the impact of ozone on crops and allows areas at high risk of ozone damage to be identified, which is a step towards mitigation of the problem. The production loss calculations were done as part of the NERC funded SUNRISE project (NEC06476) and National Capability Project NC-Air quality impacts on food security, ecosystems and health (NEC05574). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0aa7911a-ab5f-4b08-a225-28b1e8344d01

  • Data are presented from an ozone exposure experiment performed on five African crops. The crops (Beans, cowpea, finger millet, pearl millet and wheat) were exposed to three different levels of ozone in the UK CEH Bangor solardomes. Wheat was grown at UK ambient temperature, whereas the solardomes were heated for the other crops to better mimic tropical conditions. The experiment ran from May 2017 to September 2017. The crop plants were grown from seed in pots in solardomes. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the impact of ozone exposure on the crop yield and plant health. The dataset comprises of manually collected data on plant physiology, biomass and yield. In addition the automatically logged data of ozone concentration and meteorological variables in the solardomes are presented. Plant physiology data is stomatal conductance of individual leaves, measured on an ad-hoc basis. The dataset includes the associated data measured by the equipment (relative humidity, leaf temperature, photosynthetically active radiation). Soil moisture of the pots was always measured at the same time, and chlorophyll content of the measured leaf was usually, but not always, determined at the same time. Yield was determined for each plant, in addition to yield-related metrics including mass per bean and 100 grain weight. For finger millet and pearl millet yield is expressed as weight of seed heads and number of seed heads, rather than explicitly as seed weight. The ozone and meteorological dataset is complete, but with some gap-filling for short periods when the computer was not logging data. The work was carried out as part of the NERC funded SUNRISE project (NE/R000131/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f38beff1-993f-4785-8a97-1de21e3e19c0

  • Modelled average percentage yield loss due to ground-level ozone pollution (per 1 degree by 1 degree grid cell) are presented for the crops maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa), soybean (Glycine max) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) for the period 2010-2012. Data are on a global scale, based on the distribution of production for each crop, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation’s (FAO) Global Agro-Ecological Zones (GAEZ) crop production data for the year 2000. Modelled ozone data (2010-2012) needed for yield loss calculations were derived from the EMEP MSC-W (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, Meteorological Synthesising Centre-West) chemical transport model (version 4.16). Mapping the global crop yield losses due to ozone highlights the impact of ozone on crops and allows areas at high risk of ozone damage to be identified, which is one of the first steps towards mitigation of the problem. The yield loss calculations were done as part of the NERC funded SUNRISE project and National Capability Project NC-Air quality impacts on food security, ecosystems and health. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2a932995-f040-4724-ad21-3e92ae8a2540

  • The data comprise of four datasets for Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Mulika) from a season-long ozone exposure experiment in mesocosms: i) Yield and biomass data (including harvest index and individual grain weight) gathered at the end of the experiment; ii) measurements of chlorophyll content index (CCI) measured ad-hoc using a Soil-Plant Analyses Development (SPAD) chlorophyll meter throughout the experiment across all treatments; iii) measurements of leaf stomatal conductance, measured ad-hoc using a porometer throughout the experiment across all treatments; iv) results from four growth stage assessments conducted at different stages of the experiment. Yield and Biomass data are dry weights of non-edge plants, with a cutting height of 5cm above soil level. Leaf chlorophyll and stomatal conductance data were measured on the most recently fully expanded leaf (flag leaf from 28th May 2015 onwards) of randomly selected non-edge plants. The data are from an ozone and drought exposure experiment conducted during April-August 2015 at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Bangor solardome facility near Abergwyngregyn (Latitude 53.2387, Longitude -4.0176). The objective of the experiment was to determine how two abiotic stressors in combination - ozone and drought - would interact to influence growth and yield of wheat, and also what impact the timing of drought would have on the result. Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Mulika) was grown in rows within large 25-litre pots, and exposed to eight ozone treatments for 82 days. Plants experienced either (i) a well-watered regime (ii) a 10-day early-season drought event or (iii) a 10-day late-season drought event. The eight Ozone (O3) treatments ranged from a 24-hour mean of 27 parts per billion (ppb) in the lowest treatment to 57 ppb in the highest, with daily peaks ranging from 32 to 115 ppb This work was carried out as part of a Ph.D. funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) (NERC Reference NEC05014/3328/988) Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9678f446-0e2f-4f9c-860a-cbedfce4c7ec