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  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Valley Cl31 ceilometer located at Valley, Wales. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Leeming Cl31 ceilometer located at Leeming, Basingstoke. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • Range corrected lidar signal and volume depolarisation ratio data from the Met Office's Raymetrics LR111-D300 lidar located at Lerwick, Shetland Isles. Data available from July 2018 onwards, though the instrument is only operated sporadically (see below for further details). This instrument is one of a suite of 10 Raman lidars deployed by the Met Office around the UK to complement a wider network of ceilometers. Returns from these instruments form a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed. The primary aim of the Raman lidar network is the detection and quantification of volcanic ash aerosols during a volcanic event, and the network is only test fired only for a few hours each week. Outside of these times the lidars may be fired if there is a mineral dust outbreak or other such aerosol event of interest. The lidars will not fire if any precipitation is detected. Raman channel data are not presently available from this instrument in the CEDA archives.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Vaisala Ct25k ceilometer located at St Helena, British Overseas Territory. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Éireann's Knock Airport Cl31 ceilometer located at Knock Airport, Charlestown, County Mayo, northwest Ireland. The Met Éireann's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Yeovilton Cl31 ceilometer located at Yeovilton, Somerset. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Camborne Cl31 ceilometer located at Camborne, Cornwall. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • Range corrected lidar signal and volume depolarisation ratio data from the Met Office's Raymetrics LR111-D300 lidar located at Stornoway, Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. Data available from June 2018 onwards, though the instrument is only operated sporadically (see below for further details). This instrument is one of a suite of 10 Raman lidars deployed by the Met Office around the UK to complement a wider network of ceilometers within the "LIDARNET" upper air monitoring network. Returns from these instruments form a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed. The primary aim of the Raman lidar network is the detection and quantification of volcanic ash aerosols during a volcanic event, and the network is only test fired only for a few hours each week. Outside of these times the lidars may be fired if there is a mineral dust outbreak or other such aerosol event of interest. The lidars will not fire if any precipitation is detected. Raman channel data are not presently available from this instrument in the CEDA archives.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Cranwell Cl31 ceilometer located at Cranwell, Lincolnshire. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Aldergrove Cl31 ceilometer located at Aldergrove, Belfast. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.