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biodiversity

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From 1 - 10 / 44
  • Data comprise measurements of plant biomass and community composition, soil microbial community composition, greenhouse gas emissions and soil carbon and nitrogen pools from a drought experiment superimposed on a the long-term Colt Park grassland restoration experiment in northern England. Rainfall was manipulated using rain-out shelters on experimental grassland plots where fertiliser application and seed addition have been managed to enhance plant species diversity. The scientific purpose was to test the hypothesis that management aimed at biodiversity restoration increases the resistance and recovery of carbon cycling to short-term summer drought. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8a41b2a2-01d7-409e-adf5-fba3f3770f29

  • This dataset contains the codes for water laboratory analysis, sampling dates and locations for soil samples collected from the Tamar catchment in winter 2013/2014 as part of the South West project. It contains soil chemistry data for metals and mineral contents of samples soils. It should be used in conjunction with datasets describing soil bacteria and soil eukaryote operational taxonomic unit sequence data. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/de35d4ea-e75e-464c-b82f-2c2c1402cf8e

  • This dataset contains the codes for water laboratory analysis, water sample identification, sampling dates and locations for water samples collected from the Tamar catchment in winter 2013/2014 as part of the South West project. It should be used in conjunction with datasets describing water bacteria and water eukaryote operational taxonomic unit sequence data. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d36fb15b-6cfb-4488-b6b7-2b62dcf00b46

  • This dataset is derived from modelled changes to the distributions of >12,700 terrestrial mammal and bird species under four different climate scenarios, projected to 2070. It contains national-level projections of species richness change under each climate scenario, based on species' modelled climatic niches, as well as projected range shifts in relation to political borders globally. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5bf972a8-c9a3-4721-8089-552dfe3ff124

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains 10km summarised occurrence data for terrestrial mammals as mapped in the Atlas of Mammal of Great Britain and Northern Ireland published by the Mammal Society in 2020. For each species 10km grid squares were categorised based on whether the species was recorded in that square only the current atlas time period (2000-2016), only the previous atlas time period (1960-1992) or in both time periods. The dataset contains data for all species mapped in the atlas, with the exception of cetaceans which are not included in the dataset. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/422adbc3-306e-437a-9fe1-c7b53a374f87

  • This dataset comprises individual site indices for UK butterfly species calculated from data from the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Site indices are a relative rather than an absolute measure of the size of a population, and have been shown to relate closely to other, more intensive, measures of population size such as mark, release, recapture (MRR) methods. The site index can be thought of as a relative measure of the population size, being a more or less constant proportion of the number of butterflies present. The proportion seen is likely to vary according to species; some butterfly species are more conspicuous and thus more easily detected, whereas others are much less easy to see. Site indices are only calculated at sites with sufficient monitoring visits throughout the season, or for targeted reduced effort surveys (timed observations, larval web counts and egg counts) where counts are generally obtained as close to the peak of the flight period as possible and are subsequently adjusted for the time of year and size of the site (area of suitable habitat type for a given species). Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey (WCBS) sites are thus excluded because they are based on very few visits from which indices of abundance are not calculated. For transect sites, a statistical model (a General Additive Model, 'GAM') is used to impute missing values and to calculate a site index. Each year most transect sites (over 90%) produce an index for at least one species and in recent years site indices have been calculated for over 2,000 sites across the UK. Site indices are subsequently collated to contribute to the overall 'Collated Index' for each species, which are relative measures of the abundance of each species across a geographical area, for example, across the whole UK or at country level for England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Individual site indices are important in informing conservation management as not all sites show the same patterns for each species and likely reflect a combination of local climate and habitat management at the site. The UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme is organized and funded by Butterfly Conservation (BC), the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). The UKBMS is indebted to all volunteers who contribute data to the scheme. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1286b858-34a7-4ff2-84a1-a55e48d63e86

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. A spatial indicator of ecological status for valuation of biodiversity across the UK, based on species occurrence records was developed. UK species occurrence data were collated from the Biological Records Centre (BRC). The mean ecological status was calculated across all taxonomic groups for the 2000 to 2013 time period, relative to the species richness maximums from the 1970-1990 time period, showing differences as colours. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f30e4fde-634b-402a-b807-b5188d21b998

  • This is a vector data set representing the land surface of Great Britain, classified into 21 UKCEH land cover classes, based upon Biodiversity Action Plan broad habitats. This vector Land Parcel dataset is the result of intersecting the 10m raster classified pixel datasets with the UKCEH Land Parcel Spatial Framework to generate summary land parcel attributes for each land cover parcel. A full description of this and all UKCEH LCM2021 products are available from the LCM2021 product documentation accompanying this dataset. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/398dd41e-3c08-47f5-811f-da990007643f

  • This dataset includes a set of modelled outputs produced as part of the DECIDE project. Three groups were modelled; butterflies, day-flying moths and night-flying moths. (For the moths, we only considered 'macro-moths'.) For each group there are three outputs; species richness, model variability and DECIDE recording priority. The outputs summarise across multiple species within each group. The model’s prediction probability of occurrence for individual species is not made available. The outputs are in a raster format on Ordnance Survey National Grid reference system (OSGB) at 100m x 100m resolution. Species richness layers are a modelled prediction of how many species are present at a location. Model variability is used to determine where a model is uncertain about its prediction of species occurrence. Model variability is combined with information about how recently a species had been recorded to produce the DECIDE recording priority. The DECIDE recording priority is a measure to prioritise locations to support adaptive sampling of where to collect species occurrence data to improve species distribution models. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/445381ce-f412-48a0-bc3c-2d0ef4737274

  • The dataset details macrofaunal biomass across 6 intertidal sites in the winter and summer of 2013. The data provide a quantitative measure of the biomass of individual invertebrate species present within the top 10cm of sediment. Three sites were located in Essex, South East England and the other 3 in Morecambe Bay, North West England. Each site consisted of a saltmarsh habitat and adjacent mudflat habitat. 22 sampling quadrats were placed in each habitat covering 4 spatial scales. 3 replicate cores of sediment were collected at each quadrat. They were sieved on a 0.5mm mesh and the macrofauna was removed, identified to species (or appropriate taxon) and individuals of each species weighed. Values for macrofaunal biomass are expressed as grams per square metre of sediment. Biomass data for mudflat habitats across Essex and Morecambe are complete, however, saltmarsh data is only available for one full Essex site (Tillingham Marsh), in one season (winter) and across all sites, at the 1m scale. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0990858a-facc-47c5-bfbe-58fa30431db8