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ecology

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  • This service is a representation of the Land Classification of Great Britain. The Land Classification is a classification of sets of environmental strata (land classes) to be used as a basis for ecological survey. The classification was originally developed by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in the late 1970s. The strata were created from the multivariate analysis of 75 environmental variables, including climatic data, topographic data, human geographical features and geology data. The Land Classification has provided a stratification for successive ecological surveys (the Countryside Survey of Great Britain), the results of which have characterised the classes in terms of botanical, zoological and landscape features. Additionally, the Land Classification can be used to stratify a wide range of ecological and biogeographical surveys to improve the efficiency of collection, analysis and presentation of information derived from a sample. There are three layers in this WMS (1) the 1990 version of the Land Classification which contains 32 classes - classifying all 240,000km squares in Great Britain (2) the 1998 version in which the Land Classification was adjusted to 40 classes as a consequence of the need to provide National Estimates for habitats in Scotland in addition to GB (3) the 2007 version in which the Land Classification was adjusted once again, to 45 classes, as a consequence of the need to provide Wales-only estimates in addition to those for Scotland and GB.

  • The Land Classification 1998 is a classification of Great Britain into a set of 40 environmental strata, termed land classes, to be used as a basis for ecological survey, originally developed by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in the late 1970s and building upon a previous 1990 version. The strata were created from the multivariate analysis of 75 environmental variables, including climatic data, topographic data, human geographical features and geology data. The Land Classification can be used to stratify a wide range of ecological and biogeographical surveys to improve the efficiency of collection, analysis and presentation of information derived from a sample. The Land Classification 1998 provided stratification for the Countryside Survey of Great Britain 2000 and was adjusted from the 1990 version as a consequence of needing to provide National Estimates for habitats for Scotland from Countryside Survey 2000 in addition to GB as a whole. The dataset was later modified in 2007 during Countryside Survey 2007. Both the 1990 version and the 2007 version are also available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/971671a6-98b4-4d80-b165-21dace7373b9

  • The Land Classification 2007 is a classification of Great Britain into a set of 45 environmental strata, termed land classes, to be used as a basis for ecological survey, originally developed by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in the late 1970s and building upon previous 1990 and 1998 versions. The strata were created from the multivariate analysis of 75 environmental variables, including climatic data, topographic data, human geographical features and geology data. The Land Classification can be used to stratify a wide range of ecological and biogeographical surveys to improve the efficiency of collection, analysis and presentation of information derived from a sample. The Land Classification 2007 provided stratification for the Countryside Survey of Great Britain 2007 and was adjusted from the 1998 version as a consequence of needing to provide National Estimates for habitats for Wales from Countryside Survey 2007 in addition to Scotland and GB as a whole. Both the 1990 version and the 1998 versions are also available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5f0605e4-aa2a-48ab-b47c-bf5510823e8f

  • This dataset consists of stock data for Broad Habitats across Great Britain in 1978. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from 256 1km squares surveyed for the Countryside Survey and scaling up to a national level. The data are presented as percent habitat per 1km square. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, linear habitat, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/df180b2e-36ea-410e-8487-5a09942afa9e

  • The data set contains the qualitative results from fieldwork from the ‘sense of place’ and 'contemporary social representations' workpackage components of the WetlandLIFE project. Fieldwork included two discussant focus groups and thirty semi-structured interviews with specialist users of wetlands. The University of Brighton's social science qualitative fieldwork seeks to capture the different perspectives of people whose lives are intimately connected to particular English wetlands, in order to understand the range and diversity of wellbeing practices in these spaces. The target cohort are those groups of people, or organisations, that are particularly drawn to wetlands, or who could be expected to make regular use of these spaces, particularly for their health and wellbeing. Such Specialist Interest Groups (SIGs) would include birders, walkers, wildlife photographers, artists and anglers alongside educators, naturalists, spiritual practitioners and ecologists. They may not live close to the wetland sites but their field of interest, or sense of place, would be expected to include them. These interviews and focus groups took place at the case study sites in the Somerset Levels (Westhay Moor and Shapwick Heath), Bedfordshire (Priory Country Park and Millennium Country Park) and North Lincolnshire (Alkborough Flats) between January 2018 and September 2018. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the UK Data Service ReShare repository.

  • This dataset contains information about moth caterpillar masses at sites lit by streetlights (LED; high pressure sodium and low-pressure sodium) and unlit control sites. Caterpillars were sampled at 26 matched pairs of lit and unlit sites between 2018 and 2020 as part of a study of the effects of street lighting on the early life stages of moths. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7d3aa79b-43bb-493f-a14a-0d4c07f9a0d9

  • This dataset contains information about moth caterpillar abundance at sites lit by streetlights (LED; high pressure sodium and low-pressure sodium) and unlit control sites. Caterpillars were sampled at 26 matched pairs of lit and unlit sites between 2018 and 2020 as part of a study of the effects of street lighting on the early life stages of moths. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4d3f4c8a-5605-4990-8ca1-42f8ddf63698

  • Counts of caterpillars arising from a short-term experiment that installed lighting rigs in previously unlit areas to test for a change in nocturnal feeding behaviour. Caterpillars were counted from lit and control transects at two locations in Oxfordshire during January and February 2019. Lighting rigs were installed during the afternoon and switched on one hour before sunset. To give the nocturnal caterpillars time to become active, sampling occurred between 60 and 120 minutes after sunset. On a sampling night, all transects were sampled within a 5–10-minute period. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7e7ce7c1-aa16-484f-86b1-90c5b088a64c

  • Here, we present a comprehensive traits database for the butterflies and macro-moths of Great Britain and Ireland. The database covers 968 species in 21 families. Ecological traits fall into four main categories: life cycle ecology and phenology, host plant specificity and characteristics, breeding habitat, and morphological characteristics. The database also contains data regarding species distribution, conservation status, and temporal trends for abundance and occupancy. This database can be used for a wide array of purposes including further fundamental research on species and community responses to environmental change, conservation and management studies, and evolutionary biology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b5a13b6-2304-47e3-9c9d-35237d1232c6

  • The Land Classification 1990 is a classification of Great Britain into a set of 32 environmental strata, termed land classes, to be used as a basis for ecological survey, originally developed by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in the late 1970s. The strata were created from the multivariate analysis of 75 environmental variables, including climatic data, topographic data, human geographical features and geology data. The Land Classification can be used to stratify a wide range of ecological and biogeographical surveys to improve the efficiency of collection, analysis and presentation of information derived from a sample. The Land Classification 1990 provided stratification the Countryside Survey of Great Britain 1990. The dataset was later modified in 1998 and 2007 for successive Countryside Surveys, both versions of which are also available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ab320e08-faf5-48e1-9ec9-77a213d2907f