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  • This resource contains anonymised interviews with community members in Chundu Ward, Hurungwe District, Zimbabwe, conducted to further our understanding of how the local community interacts with tsetse. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants in 2012 to 2013 to investigate livelihood strategies including hunting, livestock keeping and cultivation, and how they influenced the risk of contracting trypanosomiasis. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) occurs sporadically within the Zambezi Valley in Zimbabwe and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes). African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT) is more prevalent and places significant constraints on livestock keeping. Approaches taken by local people to control or manage the disease were also investigated during the interviews. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and these interviews contributed to this consortium. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f712c52f-1ce9-4603-bc33-685221a14f50

  • The data comprises of two datasets. The first consists of text files of anonymised transcripts from focus group discussions (FGDs) on livelihood activities, ecosystem services and the prevalent human and animal health problems in irrigated and non-irrigated areas in northeastern Kenya. The second comprises of scores from proportional piling exercises which showed the distribution of wealth categories and livestock species kept. The study was conducted between August and October, 2013 and the data were collected as open-ended meeting notes and audio clips captured using digital recorders. Written/thumb print consent was always obtained from each individual in the group. All the discussions were also recorded, with the participant's permission. Thirteen FGDs were held in the irrigated areas in Bura and Hola, Tana River County involving farmers who grew a variety of crops for subsistence and commercial purposes. The others were held in Ijara and Sangailu, Garissa County inhabited by transhumance pastoralists. Each group comprised of 10 to 12 people and the discussions were guided by a check list. The transcribed documents were formatted in Microsoft Word (2013) and saved as text files in preparation for analysis. The aim of the study was to collate perceptions of land use change and their effects on ecosystem services. The data were collected by enumerators trained by experienced researchers from the University of Nairobi and the International Livestock Research Institute (Kenya). This dataset is part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project NE-J001570-1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Additional funding was provided by the CGIAR Research Program Agriculture for Nutrition and Health. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4f569d73-30c5-4b12-bca7-8901fb567594