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meteorology

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  • Data were collected by various stations around the globe, not covered by other datasets within this collection, and cover the period from 1900 until 2000. These data are the Met Office's 'old' Land Surface Observation data and have been superseded by the MIDAS dataset collection. This dataset remains for historic purposes only. The data contain measurements of hourly and daily meteorological values, such as rainfall, sunshine duration, temperature, and wind speed. The MIDAS dataset supersedes this dataset and new users should apply for access to that by following the on-screen instructions. If necessary, you will be able to access this historic dataset once you have been granted access to the MIDAS data. The dataset contains the measurements of the following parameters: Sunshine duration Snow depth Visibility Wind speed and wind direction Temperature Cloud type Past and present weather

  • The Campbell Scientific PWS100 present weather sensor deployed at the Chilbolton Observatory, Hampshire, detects and classifies precipitation by observing the scattering of a laser beam 20 degrees off the forward direction in the horizontal and vertical planes. The detected signals depend on the size, shape, optical properties, concentration and velocity of the particles. The instrument is mounted approximately 10m above ground on the roof of a cabin at the Chilbolton Observatory site. It is operated continuously. Data include: counts as a function of size of hydrometeors in 300 bins from 0.1 to 30.0 mm, the number of hydrometeors in 9 type categories. visibility, air temperature, relative humidity, rainfall rate, rainfall accumulation, average hydrometeor velocity, average hydrometeor size and reports the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) present weather code for the site. Data are archived as netCDF files.

  • Data were collected by the Chilbolton Facility for Atmospheric and Radio Research (CFARR) Meteorological Sensor from 2003 to 2007 at Sparsholt College, Hampshire. The standard meteorological measurements were made in support of all experiments at the Chilbolton Observatory. The data are automatically recorded every 10 seconds from a range of different sensors. The dataset contains measurements including temperature, dew point, pressure, wind speed and wind direction.

  • This dataset contains mean data concerning stratospheric temperature, geopotential height and wind components produced by the Stratospheric Data Assimilation System at the UK Met Office. The data assimilation system is a development of the scheme used at the Met Office for operational weather forecasting, which has been extended to cover the stratosphere. The primary product is a daily analysis (at 1200 UTC) which is produced using operational observations only. For short periods of particular interest the analyses are available at 6-hourly intervals. Assimilation experiments using UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) data in addition to operational meteorological observations have been carried out for limited periods.

  • Data were collected by stations in Germany from 1900 until 2000. These data are the Met Office's 'old' Land Surface Observation data and have been superseded by the MIDAS dataset collection. This dataset remains for historic purposes only. The data contain measurements of hourly and daily meteorological values, such as rainfall, sunshine duration, temperature, and wind speed. The MIDAS dataset supersedes this dataset and new users should apply for access to that by following the on-screen instructions. If necessary, you will be able to access this historic dataset once you have been granted access to the MIDAS data. The dataset contains the measurements of the following parameters: Sunshine duration Snow depth Visibility Wind speed and wind direction Temperature Cloud type Past and present weather

  • The University of Salford automatic weather station data describe observations made every 5 seconds with the data stored every one minute and 10 minutes at Faccombe wind turbine field site, Hampshire, form the 3rd of June 2005 until the 26th of August 2005.. The dataset contains measurements of the following parameters: Average air temperature Average dew point (measured from 11:54 BST 22nd June 2005) Average relative humidity Average net radiation Average wind speed Maximum wind speed Time of maximum wind speed Total rainfall Average pressure Average wind direction Minimum wind direction Maximum wind direction Average battery Two jpeg images files have been produced from the AWS data for each day from 3rd June 2005 (start of CSIP field project) until 26th August 2005 (end of CSIP field project). There are two image files, the first image file listed below contains plots of the windspeed, pressure and rainfall with time for a particular day. The second image file contains air temperature, relative humidity and net radiation plots with time for a particular day. The weather station consists of a Campbell Scientific 2 m tripod with a CR10X datalogger. Weather station sensors include a MP100A temperature and relative humidity probe, a A100L2 low power anemometer, a W200P potentiometer wind vane, a NR-Lite Net Radiometer, a RPT410F barometric pressure sensor and a ARG100 Tipping bucket rain gauge.

  • The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was the first major element in NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. It was designed to make a systematic study of the stratosphere and provide new data on the mesosphere and thermosphere. The satellite was launched on 12th September 1991. This dataset contains standard data concerning stratospheric temperature, geopotential height and wind components produced by the upper atmosphere research satellite data assimilation system at the UK Met Office. The data assimilation system is a development of the scheme used at the Met Office for operational weather forecasting, which has been extended to cover the stratosphere. The primary product is a daily analysis (at 1200 UTC) which is produced using operational observations only. For short periods of particular interest the analyses are available at 6-hourly intervals. Assimilation experiments using UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) data in addition to operational meteorological observations have been carried out for limited periods.

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains hourly micro-meteorological data from the experimental plots at the Climoor field site in Clocaenog forest, NE Wales. It runs from 11/9/2008 until 31/12/2013, and contains air temperature, soil temperature at two depths (5cm and 20cm) as well as soil moisture. Climoor is a climate change experiment which investigates the possible impact of increased temperatures and repeated summer drought on an Atlantic upland moorland. The experiment uses automatic roof technology to warm experimental plots by 0.5 - 1 degC and reproduces drought conditions in other experimental plots (July to September annually). In 2014, the Climoor experiment was the second longest running climate change experiment in the UK and data from the experiment has been used in several modelling exercises. The site was originally established under a EU consortium project - called CLIMOOR - where replica manipulation experiments were built in six European countries. As well as our site in North-East Wales (United Kingdom), there are identical sites in Denmark, the Netherlands, Sardinia (Italy) and Hungary. There was also a site in Catalonia (Spain). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/124ae988-41d3-4555-b704-5acc85633a05

  • Data from the Armagh Observatory, founded in 1790 by Archbishop Richard Robinson. There are around 25 astronomers who are actively studying Stellar Astrophysics, the Sun, Solar System astronomy, and the Earth's climate. As well as astronomical observations various meteorological parameters have been recorded since 1794. The data held at the BADC are daily, mean monthly and seasonal and annual maximum and minimum temperatures from 1844, the 1m and 30 cm depth soil temperatures since 1904, precipitation since 1838 and sunshine daily and mean data produced by Armagh Observatory. If users wish to find data from other areas of work undertaken by the observatory they should visit the Armagh Observatory website.

  • The Aberystwyth Egrett Experiment: Gravity Waves, Turbulence, Mixing and Filamentation in the Tropopause Region is a Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) Round 2 project led by Dr J. Whiteway and Dr G. Vaughan, Department of Physics, University of Wales, Aberystwyth. Dataset contains: airborne measurements, by the Egrett aircraft, of turbulence, ozone, water vapour, CH4 and CFCs; ground based measurements, by the NERC MST Radar, of atmospheric structure, mesoscale dynamics, and turbulence; balloons measurements of ozone, water vapour, wind, temperature and pressure; Lidar of ozone, water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds. Airborne measurements: A unique stratospheric research aircraft, the Egrett aircraft, performed 10 separate flights in the UTLS region above Aberystwyth. The Egrett was equipped with advanced instrumentation for measurements of turbulence, ozone and water vapour. Ground based measurements: The ground based facilities at Aberystwyth were operated to their full capacity during the Egrett campaign. The NERC MST Radar provided measurements of atmospheric structure, mesoscale dynamics, and turbulence. Balloons carryed instruments for measuring ozone, water vapour, wind, temperature and pressure. Three separate lidar systems provided measurements of ozone, water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds. Analysis of gravity waves and turbulence: The above measurements were conducted when gravity waves were breaking and causing turbulence. The combination of the Egrett and ground based measurements have been used to determine if this process is significant for transport of chemical constituents in the UTLS region. These measurements also provided a new basis for testing theories and models of the wave breaking process. Analysis of filamentation: The Egrett aircraft was directed to fly through regions of filamentation in the lower stratosphere. This provided new data to test theories and models of mixing through turbulence at the edges of filaments.