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  • The data describe the ecological responses (invertebrate diversity and biomass, plant diversity, soil characteristics and microbial diversity) to experimental manipulation of floristic diversity and vegetation height in planted urban meadows. The experiment consisted of a replicated set of nine different perennial meadow treatments, sown in six public urban greenspaces in the towns of Bedford and Luton, in the UK. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d0741544-cdf3-497d-996b-e30b4b7373c1

  • Three plant species, the leafy liverwort Cephaloziella varians and the angiosperms Deschampsia antarctica and Colobanthus quitensis, were sampled from 12 islands across a 1480 km latitudinal gradient from South Georgia through to Adelaide Island. Samples were collected to determine the abundance of dark septate fungi in Antarctic plant and soil communities and the effects of these organisms on plant growth. Where the target species were found in sufficient numbers to allow sampling, it proved possible to collect at least 10 samples of each species. At least 10 soil samples were collected from each site where Deschampsia was found. Plants, with intact roots and soil, were transported back to the UK using cool and frozen stowage. Additionally, intact live plants were transported to the UK in an illuminated cabinet. Seeds of the two key species (Deschampsia antarctica and Colobanthus quitensis) were also collected at Bird Island and South Georgia. As the exact months of the data collection were not provided, and the metadata standard requires a YYYY-MM-DD format, this dataset has been dated as 1st January for start date, and 31st December for stop date.

  • This study investigated the status of dark septate (DS) fungi in Antarctic plant and soil communities, with the aim of determining the abundance of DS fungi in plant roots and rhizoids, their taxonomic affinities and their symbiotic status. Abundances of fungal hyphae were recorded in roots and rhizoids, and fungi were isolated and identified. Sequencing of ITS (internal transcribed spacer) regions of rDNA indicated that some isolates share taxonomic affinities with fungi of known symbiotic status. Synthesis experiments assessed the effects of DS fungal isolates, including H. ericae, on the growth and nutrient balance of their host plants. Seeds of Deschampsia antarctica and Colobanthus quitensis were collected for use in ecophysiological experiments.

  • This web map service (WMS) depicts estimates of mean values of soil bacteria, invertebrates, carbon, nutrients and pH within selected habitats and parent material characteristics across GB . Estimates were made using CS data using a mixed model approach. The estimated means of habitat/parent material combinations using 2007 data are modelled on dominant habitat and parent material characteristics derived from the Land Cover Map 2007 and Parent Material Model 2009, respectively. Bacteria data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes bacterial community structure as assessed by ordination scores. Invertebrate data is representative of 0 - 8 cm soil depth and includes Total catch, Mite:Springtail ratio, Number of broad taxa and Shannon diversity. Gravimetric moisture content (%) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth Carbon data is representative of 0-15 cm soil depth and includes Loss-on-ignition (%), Carbon concentration (g kg-1) and Carbon density (t ha-1). Loss-on-ignition was determined by combustion of 10g dry soil at 375 deg C for 16 hours; carbon concentration was estimated by multiplying LOI by a factor of 0.55, and carbon density was estimated by combining carbon concentration with bulk density estimates. Nutrient data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes total nitrogen (N) concentration (%), C:N ratio and Olsen-Phosphorus (mg/kg). pH and bulk density (g cm-3) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth. Topsoil pH was measured using 10g of field moist soil with 25ml de-ionised water giving a ratio of soil to water of 1:2.5 by weight; bulk density was estimated by making detailed weight measurements throughout the soil processing procedure. Areas, such as urban and littoral rock, are not sampled by CS and therefore have no associated data. Also, in some circumstances sample sizes for particular habitat/parent material combinations were insufficient to estimate mean values.