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  • Theme 5 - Cryosphere and Polar Oceans - of the National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO) is aimed at resolving uncertainties in future climate and sea-level arising from behaviour of the cryosphere. Under this theme, 5 year time series Ice thickness data used by Katharine Giles, Seymour Laxon and Andy Ridout in their paper "Circumpolar thinning of Arctic sea ice following the 2007 record ice extent minimum" (Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 35, L22502, doi:10.1029/2008GL035710, 2008) are presented.

  • The SAM II instrument, aboard the Earth-orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft, was designed to measure solar irradiance attenuated by aerosol particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere. This dataset collection contains 14 years of polar Arctic and Antarctic aerosol extinction profiles, atmospheric temperature and pressure data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Instrument II (SAM II) on the NIMBUS 7 satellite.

  • The SAM II instrument, aboard the Earth-orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft, was designed to measure solar irradiance attenuated by aerosol particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere. The scientific objective of the SAM II experiment was to develop a stratospheric aerosol database for the polar regions by measuring and mapping vertical profiles of the atmospheric extinction due to aerosols. This database allows for studies of aerosol changes due to seasonal and short-term meteorological variations, atmospheric chemistry, cloud microphysics, and volcanic activity and other perturbations. The results obtained are useful in a number of applications, particularly the evaluation of any potential climatic effect caused by stratospheric aerosols. This dataset collection contains 14 years of polar Arctic and Antarctic aerosol extinction profiles, atmospheric temperature and pressure data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Instrument II (SAM II) on the NIMBUS 7 satellite.

  • COBRA (impact of COmbined iodine and Bromine Release on the Arctic atmosphere) is a UK IPY (International Polar Year) consortium that aims to investigate the release mechanisms of iodine in the Arctic and the potential combined effects of iodine and bromine on its atmosphere. The team measured reactive inorganic halogens (BrO, IO, OIO, I2), O3, Hg, HOx, HCHO, NOx, VOCs and reactive halocarbons from temporary laboratories located on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, north of Kuujjuarapik, during February-March 2008. Met balloons and O3 sondes were launched daily. COBRA set up an ice camp and flux chamber experiments ~500 m into the bay to directly measure halogen emissions and ozone deposition, and measured physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the sea-ice (and potentially of frost flowers) at different depths. The project is linked with OOTI, which carried out a simultaneous field experiment at Kuujjuarapik. The dataset measurements come from the British Antartic Survey (BAS) Frost Flower Specific Surface Area (SSA) using a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement apparatus.

  • COBRA (impact of COmbined iodine and Bromine Release on the Arctic atmosphere) is a UK IPY (International Polar Year) consortium that aims to investigate the release mechanisms of iodine in the Arctic and the potential combined effects of iodine and bromine on its atmosphere. The team measured reactive inorganic halogens (BrO, IO, OIO, I2), O3, Hg, HOx, HCHO, NOx, VOCs and reactive halocarbons from temporary laboratories located on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, north of Kuujjuarapik, during February-March 2008. Met balloons and O3 sondes were launched daily. COBRA set up an ice camp and flux chamber experiments ~500 m into the bay to directly measure halogen emissions and ozone deposition, and measured physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the sea-ice (and potentially of frost flowers) at different depths. The project is linked with OOTI, which carried out a simultaneous field experiment at Kuujjuarapik.

  • The data are from a study investigating ozone (O3) variability in the polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere and uncertainties / biases in satellite ozone profile measurements. The datasets include 1) processed atmospheric datasets derived from O3 observations by the ground-based Ny Ålesund Ozone in the Mesosphere Instrument (NAOMI), an 11.072 GHz ozone radiometer making atmospheric observations from Ny Ålesund, Spitsbergen since 4 July 2017, 2) processed atmospheric datasets derived from selected O3 observations by the SABER satellite instrument, and 3) ancillary atmospheric datasets used for NAOMI retrievals, derived from model (WACCM-D) and reanalysis (MERRA-2) datasets. Supported in part by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) / Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Technologies Proof-of-Concept grant reference NE/P003478/1 "Satellite TV-based Ozone and OH Observations using Radiometric Measurements (STO3RM)". MOSAIC instrument testing and deployment was supported by the Royal Society Newton Fund reference NI150103 "The Effect of High Energy Particle Precipitation from Space on the Earth''s Atmosphere". Pekka T. Verronen was supported by Academy of Finland project no. 335555 "ICT-Solutions to Understand Variability of Arctic Climate (ICT-SUNVAC)".

  • Multiple images of the seafloor at six sites across a broad latitudinal range in the Barents Sea in the Arctic were collected in July 2017 on the month long scientific cruise JR16006. The dataset includes environmental variables for each accompanied image. Each image (406 x 341mm) has density of fauna from different functional groups. We have 13 different functional groups based on other similar studies. The aim was to look at the effect of climate change in the Arctic on the biology of the seafloor. Funding was provided by the NERC Changing Arctic Oceans ChAOS project.

  • The data are from a study investigating nitric oxide (NO) variability in the polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere during geomagnetic storms, and the role of energetic electron precipitation in NO production. The datasets include 1) processed atmospheric datasets derived from selected NO observations by the AIM-SOFIE satellite instrument, 2) estimated electron and proton fluxes derived from POES/MEPED/SEM-2 measurements, 3) zonal and meridional wind speeds calculated using the Horizontal Wind Model (HWM14), and 4) geomagnetic indices, solar wind speed, and solar proton event (SPE) data. Funding was provided by the NERC grants NE/J022187/1 and NE/R016038/1, and the New Zealand Marsden Fund.

  • COBRA (impact of COmbined iodine and Bromine Release on the Arctic atmosphere) is a UK IPY (International Polar Year) consortium that aims to investigate the release mechanisms of iodine in the Arctic and the potential combined effects of iodine and bromine on its atmosphere. The team measured reactive inorganic halogens (BrO, IO, OIO, I2), O3, Hg, HOx, HCHO, NOx, VOCs and reactive halocarbons from temporary laboratories located on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, north of Kuujjuarapik, during February-March 2008. Met balloons and O3 sondes were launched daily. COBRA set up an ice camp and flux chamber experiments ~500 m into the bay to directly measure halogen emissions and ozone deposition, and measured physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the sea-ice (and potentially of frost flowers) at different depths. The project is linked with OOTI, which carried out a simultaneous field experiment at Kuujjuarapik.