Keyword

relative humidity

18 record(s)
 
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  • This dataset contains surface air temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) measurements from the Meteorologiska Institutionen Stockholms Universitet (MISU) Rotronic T/RH sensor mounted on board the Swedish Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. Measurements were made at 1 Hz frequency and this dataset was prepared for archiving by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • Data were collected under the NERC funded project - The role of land-use change on influencing mountain climate on Kilimanjaro, East Africa (NE/J013366/1) - lead by Dr Nicholas Pepin (University of Portsmouth) which investigated the influence of land-use on surface climate (temperature and moisture availability) on Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa. Temperature measurements were taken at hourly intervals at 23 stations on Mount Kilimanjaro between September 2012 and September 2015. Specific station locations (elevation and lat/long) are stated in the data and are ordered in a transect across the mountain from South-West over the top to North-East. Two of the stations have both ground level and air level sensors (hence there are 25 readings not 23). Additional information about station locations and missing data can be found in a PDF on the CEDA archive.

  • This dataset contains surface meteorological measurements including air temperature, relative humidity, surface irradiation and wind measurements from the Meteorologiska Institutionen Stockholms Universitet (MISU) weather station on board the Swedish Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. These data came from an automatic weather station installed on the 7th deck of the Icebreaker Oden, approximately 25m above the surface, measuring at 1 Hz frequency. The system was operated by Joe Sedlar who also undertook data quality control and there are several flag variables for T/RH and radiation measurements documenting known data issues - notably when primary measurements have been replaced with those from other sensors, or corrections applied. This version of the dataset was then prepared for archiving with the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • The data were collected by the Met Office’s Radiometrics TP/WVP-3000 which was deployed to Linkenholt on 13 June until 21 September 2005. The dataset contains plots of temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and rainfall amount. It was initially configured to view in the zenith direction with very high time resolution (~12 s). All channels also viewed the internal black body target for relative calibration, initially every 5 minutes. However, initially this did not take place between 11 – 13 UTC due to a configuration error, which was corrected on 8 July 2005. Prior to this date, the calibration of data around noon is prone to drift. The radiometer ran continuously in this mode until 20 July 2005, when it was re-configured to alternative between zenith views and internal black body calibration views in a 30 s cycle because of concerns over the drift in calibration over the previous 5 minute calibration period. There was a power outage on 2 August 2005 from 0730 – 0946 UTC when no radiometer data was available.

  • Data were collected under the NERC funded project - The role of land-use change on influencing mountain climate on Kilimanjaro, East Africa (NE/J013366/1) - lead by Dr Nicholas Pepin (University of Portsmouth) which investigated the influence of land-use on surface climate (temperature and moisture availability) on Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa. Relative humidity measurements were taken at hourly intervals at 23 stations on Mount Kilimanjaro between September 2012 and September 2015. Specific station locations (elevation and lat/long) are stated in the data and are ordered in a transect across the mountain from South-West over the top to North-East. Two of the stations have both ground level and air level sensors (hence there are 25 readings not 23). Additional information about station locations and missing data can be found in a PDF on the CEDA archive.

  • Data were collected under the NERC funded project - The role of land-use change on influencing mountain climate on Kilimanjaro, East Africa (NE/J013366/1) - lead by Dr Nicholas Pepin (University of Portsmouth) which investigated the influence of land-use on surface climate (temperature and moisture availability) on Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa. Temperature and relative humidity (RH) data were collected hourly from 23 stations located on Mount Kilimanjaro between September 2012 to September 2015.

  • A high density weather observation data set from the Kampala area in Uganda has been produced through the collaboration of the projects: Integrating Hydro-Climate Science into Policy Decisions for Climate-Resilient Infrastructure and Livelihoods in East Africa (HyCRISTAL); and Networks of Hydrometeorological Stations. The network is one of a series of hydromet networks in urban centres in sub-Saharan Africa that were installed under the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) programme, Future Climate for Africa (FCFA). This data set consists of fifteen minute data from two automatic weather stations (AWS) and three rain gauges located within a 20 km2 area of Kampala, Uganda, measured over the period 17 Nov 2017 to 30 Jun 2019. The parameters measured at the Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) are: barometric pressure (hPa); global radiation (W/m2); precipitation (mm); relative humidity (%RH); temperature (°C); wind direction (°); wind speed (km/h); maximum wind speed (km/h). The purpose of the network is to provide data to aid the modelling of flooding in Kampala and also to provide additional baseline meteorological monitoring in Kampala. The datasets are complete for the full period of monitoring apart from the following: - Lugoba Reservoir, 19:30 2 May 2018 to 07:45 3 May 2018 - Freka Enterprises, Tula Road, 19:15 2 May 2018 to 08:15 3 May 2018 The contract for the installation of the Kampala stations was carried out by OTT Hydromet. They were installed with the assistance of the Uganda National Meteorological Authority, the Ugandan Ministry of Water and Environment and the Ugandan National Water and Sewerage Company.

  • The NERC-funded HiTemp project was conducted by the Birmingham Urban Climate Laboratory (BUCL) research team to examine Birmingham's Urban Heat Island (UHI). The project operated a high density air temperature-sensor network and has lead to a number of research projects examining Birmingham's UHI in more detail than ever-before possible. This dataset collection temperature, dew point, relative humidity, pressure, solar radiation, precipitation, wind and hail measurements from a high density network of meteorological sensors installed within the Birmingham conurbation. This includes 73 Aginova Sentinel Micro air temperature sensors and 25 Vaisala WXT520 weather transmitters between 2012-14. These measurements have been made by the Birmingham Urban Climate Laboratory (BUCL) for the HiTemp (High Density Measurements within the Urban Environment) project in order to study the Birmingham Urban Heat Island (UHI)

  • HadISDH (Integrated Surface Database Humidity) is a monthly 5° by 5° gridded global surface humidity climate monitoring dataset created from in-situ sub-daily synoptic data. The data have been quality controlled and homogenised (land), bias adjusted (marine) and buddy checked (marine). Monthly mean climate anomalies are provided alongside uncertainty estimates, actual values, climatological means and standard deviations for specific humidity, relative humidity, vapour pressure, dew point temperature, wet bulb temperature, dew point depression in addition to the simultaneously observed temperature.

  • The meteorological data describes the air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction and the vapour pressure deficit. Data collection was carried out at Abbotts Hall marsh from the 15th of December 2012 till the 27th of January 2015. The Abbotts Hall site is in Essex, South East England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dd2f7d23-6f11-4053-bc18-3cf2431c1963