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  • During the austral summer of 2001/02 five thousand line kilometres of airborne radio echo sounding and aeromagnetic data were collected in the region of three tributaries of Slessor Glacier, East Antarctica, which drains into the Filchner Ice Shelf. We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding acquired using the BAS aerogeophysicaly equipped Twin Otter aircraft. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data. Data were collected as part of UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) grant GR3/AFI2/65

  • During the 2001-02 field season a regional survey was flown on a 10 km line spacing grid over the drainage basin of the Rutford Ice stream (West Antarctica), as part of the TORUS (Targeting ice stream onset regions and under-ice systems) project. We present here the bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the "BAS-built" radar depth sounding system mounted on the BAS aerogeophysical equipped Twin Otter aircraft. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data

  • During the 2010/2011 Antarctic field season a collaborative NERC AFI (Antarctic Funding Initiative) project studying the basal boundary conditions of the Institute & Moller ice streams, West Antarctica, collected ~25,000 km of new high quality aerogeophysics data. Data were acquired using the BAS PASIN depth sounding radar mounted in the BAS aerogeophysically equipped Twin Otter "Bravo Lima". Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data. Data were collected as part of the UK Natural Environment Research Council AFI grant NE/G013071/1.

  • A British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter and survey team acquired 15,500 line-km of aerogeophysical data during the 2001/02 Antarctic field season along a 1-km line spacing grid with tie-lines 8 km apart. Twenty-five flights were flown from the South African base SANAE, for a total of 100 survey hours. We present here the processed bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding. The airborne-radio echosounding data were collected for 5 flights, to image ice-thickness and bedrock configuration. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data. This high-resolution aerogeophysical survey was part of the "Magmatism as a Monitor of Gondwanabreak-up" project (MAMOG) of the British Antarctic Survey, which included new geochemical investigations, structural geology, geochronology, and AMS studies over western Dronning Maud Land.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the GRADES-IMAGE project funded by BAS over the Antarctic Peninsula, Ellsworth Mountains and Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (also including the Evans Ice stream and Carson Inlet) mainly to image englacial layers and bedrock topography during the 2006/07 field season. Operating from temporary field camps at Sky Blu, Partiot Hills and out of RABID depot (Rutford Ice Stream), we collected ~27,550 km of airborne radio-echo sounding data over 100 hours of surveying. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, and an ice-sounding radar system (PASIN). Note that there was no gravimetric element to this survey. We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • Three separate airborne radar surveys were flown during the austral summer of 2016/17 over the Filchner Ice Shelf and Halley Ice Shelf (West Antarctica), and over the outlet glacier flows of the English Coast (western Palmer Land, Antarctic Peninsula) during the Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project. This project was a NERC-funded (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) collaborative initiative between the British Antarctic Survey, the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. The 2016/17 aerogeophysics surveys acquired a total of ~26,000 line km of aerogeophysical data. The FISS survey consisted of 17 survey flights totalling ~16,000 km of radar data over the Support Force, Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams of the Filchner Ice Shelf. The Halley Ice Shelf survey consisted of ~4,600 km spread over 5 flights and covering the area around the BAS Halley 6 station and the Brunt Ice Shelf. The English Coast survey consisted of ~5,000 km spread over 7 flights departing from the Sky Blu basecamp and linking several outlet glacier flows and the grounding line of the western Palmer Land, including the ENVISAT, CRYOSAT, GRACE, Landsat, Sentinel, ERS, Hall, Nikitin and Lidke ice streams. Our Twin Otter aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, an iMAR strapdown gravity system, and a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN-2). We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • This dataset contains bed and surface elevation picks derived from airborne radar collected in 2016/17 over the Filchner Ice Shelf and Halley Ice Shelf (West Antarctica) as part of the 5-year Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project funded by NERC (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) and awarded to the British Antarctic Survey with contribution from the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute. The aim of this project was to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. This collaborative initiative collected ~15,000 line-km of new aerogeophysical data using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter. The majority of flights were flown as part of FISS over the Support Force, Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams. Separate flights over Halley 6 research station and Brunt Ice Shelf were also collected as part of this season. The bed and surface elevation picks for the English Coast part of this season are available at: https://doi.org/10.5285/e07d62bf-d58c-4187-a019-59be998939cc.

  • During the austral summer of 2004/05 a collaborative US/UK field campaign undertook a systematic geophysical survey of the entire Amundsen Sea embayment using comparable airborne survey systems mounted in Twin Otter aircraft. Here we present the portion of the survey covering the Pine Island Glacier basin led by British Antarctic Survey. Operating from a temporary field camp (PNE, S 77deg34'' W 095deg56''); we collected ~35,000 km of airborne survey data. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, gravity meter, and a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN). We present here the bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar depth sounding system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • This dataset contains bed and surface elevation picks derived from airborne radar collected in 2015/16 over Foundation Ice Stream and Filchner Ice Shelf as part of the 5-year Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project funded by NERC (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) and awarded to the British Antarctic Survey with contribution from the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute. The aim of this project was to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. This collaborative initiative collected ~7,000 line-km of new aerogeophysical data using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the BBAS science programme funded by the British Antarctic Survey over the Pine Island Glacier system during the austral summer of 2004/05. This survey was a collaborative US/UK field campaign which undertook a systematic geophysical survey of the entire Amundsen Sea embayment using comparable airborne survey systems mounted in Twin Otter aircraft. Operating from a temporary field camp (PNE, S 77deg34'' W 095deg56''), we collected ~35,000 km of airborne survey data. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, gravity meter, and the first version of a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN) used for the first time to support this survey. We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.