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  • Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) was a £20 million, six-year (2001-2007) programme for the Natural Environment Research Council. The programme aimed to improve the ability to quantify the probability and magnitude of future rapid change in climate, with a main (but not exclusive) focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean's Thermohaline Circulation. This dataset collection contains comparison of high-resolution isotope records from terrestrial archives in NW Europe with model simulations of isotopes in precipitation. The aims of the proposal were to compare high-resolution isotope records from terrestrial archives in NW Europe with model simulations of isotopes in precipitation in order to investigate the role of different forcing factors in rapid climate change during the late glacial and Holocene and to undertake model validation. The proposal constitutes a UK contribution to the PAGES ISOMAP initiative. A water isotope model was developed for the UK Hadley centre model HadCM3. Comparisons have been made between simulations of the isotopic composition of precipitation during periods of rapid climatic change and reconstructions from well-dated and well-calibrated palaeo-archives (lake sediments, peat and speleothem) generated in this study and obtained from the literature, in order to investigate the causes and nature of abrupt climatic events.

  • The "ISOMAP UK" project was a combined data-modelling investigation of water isotopes and their interpretation during rapid climate change events project was a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) RAPID Climate Change Research Programme project (Round 1 - NER/T/S/2002/00460 - Duration 1 May 2003 - 30 Apr 2008) led by Prof J.A. Holmes of the University College London, with co-investigators at the University of Southampton, University of Liverpool, University of Manchester, University of Bristol and the NERC British Antarctic Survey. This dataset contains comparison of high-resolution isotope records from terrestrial archives in NW Europe with model simulations of isotopes in precipitation. This is a control 9K simulation, and a freshwater hosing experiment. The freshwater hosing experiment had 5Sv of freshwater added to the North Atlantic for 1 year. The freshwater forcing was then removed and the model allowed to adjust. Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) was a £20 million, six-year (2001-2007) programme for the Natural Environment Research Council. The programme aimed to improve the ability to quantify the probability and magnitude of future rapid change in climate, with a main (but not exclusive) focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean's Thermohaline Circulation.

  • Data from observations made at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) which exists to advance understanding of climatically significant interactions between the atmosphere and ocean and to provide a regional focal point and long-term data. The observatory is based on Calhau Island of São Vicente, Cape Verde at 16.848N, 24.871W, in the tropical Eastern North Atlantic Ocean, a region which is data poor but plays a key role in atmosphere-ocean interactions of climate-related and biogeochemical parameters including greenhouse gases. It is an open-ocean site that is representative of a region likely to be sensitive to future climate change, and is minimally influenced by local effects and intermittent continental pollution. The dataset contains long term measurements of CO mixing ratio made from 7.5m using a fast response vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence CO analyser (Aerolaser 5001) 2008-2015 and using a Picarro G2401 Analyser from 2015 onwards .

  • This dataset contains time series observations of surface-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, water, and energy, as well as supporting micrometeorological, soil physics, and vegetation measurements. Data have been obtained at ten eddy covariance (EC) flux observation sites across England and Wales. Sites were active for different time periods between 2018 and 2023. Flux data include net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE), sensible heat (H), and latent heat (LE). Examples of ancillary and vegetation data include measurements of air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, components of radiation, soil heat flux, soil temperature and moisture, precipitation, water table depth, biomass, leaf area index (LAI), and canopy height. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/06d7c463-298c-4c7e-a4c3-55d003aa91cb