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  • This dataset contains derived cloud layer measurements of Icebreaker Oden utilising data from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science's Atmospheric Measurement Facility's (NCAS AMF) Halo Doppler lidar and NOAA cloud radar on board Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. The data provide altitudes of cloud base and top for the first two cloud layers. Cloud base was established from the laser ceilometer (base of liquid cloud) whist he cloud top was established from the cloud radar data. Where fog was detected, the fog top altitude from the radar data is given. Note: it was possible for the radar to detect a cloud top where the laser ceilometer was not able to detecte a cloud base. These data were prepared for archiving as NetCDF data at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • This dataset contains combined measurements of platform motion and final velocity and attitude corrections for turbulence measurements on the foremast of Icebreaker Oden utilising data from the ship's navigation unit alongside data from the University of Leeds' XSens motion and heading sensory package. These data include ship speed over group, course, heading etc, for Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. The XSens motion pack was mounted at the base of the sonic anemometer, in the same reference frame (rotated 30 deg to port from bow). Rotation angles given in the dataset are with respect to the earth frame, with x-axis positive to east. Corrections combine high rate data from the Xsens package with low rate data from the ship navigation system (heading and speed) to derive the full earth-relative platform motion at 20Hz. The motion calculation follows Edson et al. (1988) and Prytherch et al. (2015) - see linked documentation. These data are provided as supportive data for use with the other datasets within this collection, helping to account for ship movement during the expedition for later data analysis. These data were prepared for archiving as NetCDF data at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • This dataset contains provides the final best estimates of fluxes, mean environmental variables and derived transfer coefficient estimates, along with asociated quality control flags, during the Icebreaker Oden voyage durning the Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) in summer 2014. These were calculated based on instrumentation data from the University of Leeds' Metek sonic anemometer, Licor LI-7500 gas analyzer and XSENS MTi-G-700 motion pack, plus mean surface meteorology data provided from the automatic weather station operated on board by the Department of Meteorology, Stockholm University (MISU). Other data from the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements. The document "ACSE_turbulent_fluxes_readme.txt" in the archive contains fuller details of the flux calculations. The final data, prepared for archiving as NetCDF data at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds, contain: 1) The final quality controlled best estimates of 20-min averaged dynamic fluxes, associated mean environmental variables (10m wind, etc), transfer coefficients, and quality control flags. 2) The raw kinematic fluxes, etc that go into generating (1), along with the quality control variables used in generating the QC flags, and the QC flags. 3) Other environmental variables (in some cases with duplicates from multiple different sensors) averaged onto the same time base as the flux estimates. The authors note that in all cases a lot of work has been done on quality control and applying suitable corrections to raw measurements. In many cases other choices could have been made, and additional QC measures may need to be applied. Most of the work on the flux data processing has been done by John Prytherch, with additional input from Ian Brooks and Dominic Salisbury. Additional work on ancillary data was undertaken by other members of the ACSE science team.

  • This dataset contains composite temperature, humidity and wind profiles, plus derived products, from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science's Atmospheric Measurement Facility (NCAS AMF) radiosondes launched from the Swedish Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. These data consist of individual radiosonde profiles as 2D time/height fields, with all profiles interpolated onto a fixed vertical grid for ease of analysis/plotting across the outward (leg 1) and return (leg 2) parts of the expedition. The vertical grid used is: 1m step to 5km, 10m step between 5 and 12 km, 50m step between 12 and 20 km. The data also includes derived variables (potential temperature etc). Barbara Brooks (NCAS AMF) was responsible for the radiosonde ascents during the voyage and for the original data, whilst Ian Brookes prepared these data for archiving. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • Characterising and Interpreting FLuxes Over Sea Ice (CANDIFLOS) is a data analysis project drawing upon data from multiple field campaigns. It aims to improve the parameterization of surface fluxes over sea ice. This data set consists of the processed surface heat fluxes and sea ice fractions from the Arctic Clouds Summer Experiment (ACSE) project (2014) conducted on icebreaker Oden. Matching data from the AO2016 cruise are provided as a separate data set.

  • Characterising and Interpreting FLuxes Over Sea Ice (CANDIFLOS) is a data analysis project drawing upon data from multiple field campaigns. It aims to improve the parameterization of surface fluxes over sea ice. This data set consists of the processed surface heat fluxes and sea ice fractions from the Arctic Ocean 2016 (AO2016) project (2016) conducted on the icebreaker Oden. Matching data from the Arctic Clouds Summer Experiment (ACSE) cruise (2014) are provided as a separate data set.

  • This dataset contains ship navigation data, including speed over group, course, heading etc, fomr the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat's (SPRS) Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. These data are provided as supportive data for use with the other datasets within this collection, helping to account for ship movement during the expedition for later data analysis. These data were prepared for archiving as NetCDF data at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • This dataset contains surface meteorological measurements including air temperature, relative humidity, surface irradiation and wind measurements from the Meteorologiska Institutionen Stockholms Universitet (MISU) weather station on board the Swedish Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. These data came from an automatic weather station installed on the 7th deck of the Icebreaker Oden, approximately 25m above the surface, measuring at 1 Hz frequency. The system was operated by Joe Sedlar who also undertook data quality control and there are several flag variables for T/RH and radiation measurements documenting known data issues - notably when primary measurements have been replaced with those from other sensors, or corrections applied. This version of the dataset was then prepared for archiving with the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.