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British Geological Survey

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  • The register lists Lower Palaeozoic microfaunas (including "small shelly" faunas), but occasionally mentions small trilobites and various fragments. SAQ1-259 are used, although several numbers have no details assigned to them. Sample number, sheet number, NGR, fossil identification, borehole names & depths are given.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project CO2 storage in Palaeogene and Neogene hydrogeological systems of the North Sea: preparation of an IODP scientific drilling bid was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-30. The North Sea Basin (NSB) is considered to be suitable for commercial-scale CO2 storage, due to its favourable geological setting, its proximity to sources, and pioneering operational experience storing CO2 at the Sleipner injection site. The shallow Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the NSB form the overburden and seal to these underlying CO2 reservoirs but are under-researched, even though the NSB is a mature petroleum system, penetrated by many thousands of wells. Quaternary sediments, up to 1000 metres thick, are in general bypassed to reach the deeper, profitable hydrocarbon resources. UKCCSRC and CLIMIT programme funded scientific, governmental and industrial partners from the UK and Norway to collaborate with the purpose of submitting a proposal to the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) for scientific drilling to investigate the overburden to CO2 storage strata.

  • In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2014 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads, it supercedes the earlier 2012 version. The model complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 25,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them together and incorporate around 300 deep stratigraphic boreholes across England and Wales. The sections also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the scientific literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram has been built in stages between 2009-14 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme the Environment Agency of England and Wales, and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. Some 16 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.

  • Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) representing geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The scale of the data is 1:625 000 scale providing a simplified interpretation of the linear features and may be used as a guide at a regional or national level, but should not be relied on for local geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland. Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The digital data are attributed by fault type; two categories of fault are described in the data: fault at rockhead (representing normal dip-slip and strike-slip faults) and thrust fault (representing faults caused by compressive forces). The data has been generalised and shows only the location of major faults. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are delivered free of charge under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

  • The map shows the potential for the rocks to supply groundwater and the type of groundwater flow within the rocks. The dataset reattributes polygons in the Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain - 625k (DiGMapGB-625) Bedrock version 5 dataset to indicate whether the bedrock is an aquifer, the type of flow through the aquifer (fracture and fissure flow or intergranular flow) and how productive the aquifer is likely to be. The dataset is based on the known hydrogeological properties of rock types. The dataset covers just the bedrock formations for the UK and the Isle of Man. The data can be used for planning, environmental analysis, water supply and hazards.

  • The Quaternary deposits summary lithologies dataset is a digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200 m, which groups the deposits into classes based on similar engineering geology characteristics. The map is derived from (unpublished) BGS 1:1,000,000 scale Quaternary digital geological mapping, so is effective at that scale. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The divisions on the map combine the Quaternary deposits into 7 categories of similar strength and lithological variability, each with a ‘Category’ title that summarises their main lithological character: diamict; firm to hard interbedded (layered); firm to hard mud; sand and gravel; soft interbedded; soft mud; undifferentiated. These categories can be used as a basis for assessing, in conjunction with a range of other geological factors, the geological constraints on engineering structures at or close to the seabed. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile.

  • The data comprises a GIS layers representing the permeability of Superficial geological deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale, 1:625:000, is used. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The data comprises GIS layers representing the permeability of mass movement deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000,. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through mass movement deposits and the ability of a unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • This presentation on the EPSRC project, DiSECCS, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 8.04.13. Grant number: Grant number: EP/K035878/1.

  • The data consists of an extended abstract submitted to the '8th Trondheim Conference on CO2 Capture, Transport and Storage', Trondheim, Norway, 16-18th June 2015. The abstract describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The Captain Sandstone saline aquifer has a potential to store large volumes of CO2 as part of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, however it is known to be affected by regional faults, some of which extend to the seabed. An in situ stress analysis is performed in order to deduce the stresses affecting these faults and to assess their geomechanical stability.