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    This dataset comprises hydrographic data from conductivity and temperature sensors deployed at fixed intervals on moorings within the water column or close to the sea bed on benthic frames. The measurements were collected at five sites within the Faroe – Shetland channel during the FS Poseidon cruise PO328 between 07 and 23 September 2005. The data have been processed, quality controlled and made available by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC). The data were collected as part of the Slope Mixing Experiment, a Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory (POL) core Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded project, which aimed to estimate slope mixing and its effects on waters in the overturning circulation. Detailed in situ measurements of mixing in the water column) were to be combined with fine resolution 3-D and process models. The experiment was lead by POL, in collaboration with the School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor; the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS); the University of Highlands and Islands and the Institute of Marine Studies (IMS) at the University of Plymouth. The Slope Mixing Experiment dataset also includes conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), vessel mounted ADCP sensors as well as 3-D and process models. These data are not available from BODC.

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    Historic sea level data from 6 sites on the South coast of England, recovered as part of a PhD on sea level trends in the English Channel. Devonport: 1961-1986, 1988-1990 Newhaven: 1942-1948, 1950-1951, 1953-1957, 1964-1965, 1973, 1988 Portsmouth: 1961-1990 Southampton: 1935-1979, 1982-1990 St. Marys: 1968-1969, 1973, 1975, 1977-1978, 1987-1989 Weymouth: 1967-1971, 1983-1987 There are raw data files and cleaned data files. The cleaned files have been corrected for datum changes which are recorded in the readme files for each site.

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    The Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Sub-mesoscale Interaction Study (OSMOSIS) data set contains a variety of oceanographic measurements including a year long time series of the properties of the ocean surface boundary layer and its controlling 3D physical processes. The core observations include measurements of temperature, salinity, nutrients, currents and shear harvested from a suite of instrumentation including CTDs, ocean gliders, drifter buoys and moored sensors. OSMOSIS data were collected during three cruises. The first cruise undertook preliminary exploratory work in the Clyde Sea (September 2011) to hone techniques and strategies. The following cruises carried out mooring deployments and recovery in the vicinity of the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP) observatory (in late Summer 2012 and 2013 respectively). Additional opportunist ship time being factored in to support the ambitious glider operations associated with OSMOSIS. This multiple year study will combine traditional observational techniques, such as moorings and CTDs, with the latest autonomous sampling technologies (including ocean gliders), capable of delivering near real-time scientific measurements through the water column. The OSMOSIS data set will contain high-resolution vertical measurements, which will shed light on the complex turbulent processes that drive the deepening of the OSBL and similarly the sub-mesoscale processes promoting OSBL re-stratification. Continuous mooring and glider measurements over a complete annual cycle will also provide invaluable insight into how the OSBL evolves over time. The NERC OSMOSIS Consortium brings together scientists from various UK research centres including the University of Southampton School of Ocean and Earth Sciences, University of Reading, Bangor and the National Oceanography Centre (NOC).

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    This dataset consists of measurements of underway meteorology, navigation and sea surface hydrography, seismic reflection and refraction, and bathythermograph data collected during a comprehensive survey of the Tonga-Kermadec island arc-deep-sea trench system, undertaken between April and June 2011. Data were collected on RV Sonne cruise SO215 by an integrated marine geophysical experiment that comprised simultaneous seismic reflection (MCS) and wide-angle (WA) refraction, gravity, magnetic, bathymetry and sub-seabed high-resolution imaging of the Louisville Ridge-Tonga-Kermadec Trench collision system. This cruise formed the field component of NERC Discovery Science project "The Louisville Ridge-Tonga Trench collision: Implications for subduction zone dynamics". The key scientific objectives for the cruise were as follows: a)Determine the 'background' crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the subducting plate; b)Determine the crustal and uppermost mantle structure across and along the Louisville Ridge; c)Determine the physical properties of the leading edges of the subducting and over-riding plates; d)Determine the state of isostasy, ridge-related flexure and moat characteristics at the Louisville Ridge, and the mechanical properties of the subducting and over-riding plates; e)Determine the seafloor morphology and collision-related deformation in the Tonga forearc. The Discovery Science project was composed of Standard Grant reference NE/F004273/1 as the lead grant with child grant NE/F005318/1. The lead grant ran from 1 Mar 2011 - 31 Aug 2016 and the child grant ran from 1 Oct 2010 - 30 Sep 2014. Professor Christine Peirce of University of Durham, Department of Earth Sciences was the principal investigator of the lead grant of this project. Prof Anthony Watts of University of Oxford, Earth Science was the principal investigator of the child grant. The bathythermograph data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RV Sonne, processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and will be made available online soon. The remaining data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RV Sonne and are available on request.

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    This dataset contains a variety of hydrographic measurements including temperature, salinity, sound velocity, current speed/ direction and seismic data. Hydrographic profilers provided measurements of temperature, salinity, sound velocity and density. Four mooring stations were also installed as part of this project, with three minilogger chains providing temperature data and four moored ADCPs measuring current veloicty. The project ran from February 2006 to September 2009, however all of the data were collected between 17 April 2007 and 14 May 2007 during two cruises which took place in the Gulf of Cadiz. The research was conducted using two research vessels, the RRS Discovery (cruise D318) and the RV Poseidon (cruise PO350). The RRS Discovery cruise D318 was split into two legs, D318a, which took place between 17 April 2007 and 23 April 2007 and D318b, which took place between 29 April 2007 and 14 May 2007. For the second leg of cruise D318, the RRS Discovery was joined by the RV Poseidon. Hydrographic measurements were taken using a variety of instruments, including expendable bathythermographs (XBT), expendable CTDs (XCTD), conductivity-temperature depth (CTD) profilers, acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP) and VEMCO minilogger chains. Airguns and streamers were used in the recording of the seismic data. The main objectives of the Geophysical Oceanography (GO) project were A) To evaluate and improve new research methods in the developing field of seismic oceanography by exploiting the opportunity of two-ship operations between RSS Discovery and RV Poseidon and B) To study the internal wave field and mixing processes in the Gulf of Cadiz and demonstrate quantitative links between seismic and oceanographic measurements. The cruise was coordinated by Durham Univerity and funded under an EU grant as part of the Framework 6 NEST programme. Eight scientific institutions were involved in the project. These were: the University of Durham, the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory (POL), the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (IFM-GEOMAR), the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (IFREMER), the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, the Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), the University of Western Brittany and the University of Lisbon. Data from the programme are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

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    The Marine Autonomous Systems in Support of Marine Observations (MASSMO) campaign 4 dataset includes data collected by 8 submarine gliders, 2 wavegliders and one autonomous surface vehicle. The dataset comprises recovery version data. i.e. the data downloaded from a vehicle at the end of its mission. The data obtained from gliders operated by the University of East Anglia (UEA) is fully quality controlled. No quality control procedures have been applied to the data obtained from all other autonomous vehicles. Parameters observed include, temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, optical backscatter, oxygen, acoustic noise and video data. The dataset was collected within the UK sector of the Faroe-Shetland Channel, focussing on the outer shelf and upper shelf. The work area had a bounding box of 58-62 degrees north and 2-9 degrees west. The MASSMO 4 campaign was run between 1st June 2017 until 7th June 2017 while platforms were deployed they were collecting data continuously. The dataset was collected using a mixture of three autonomous surface vehicles and eight submarine gliders. Glider sensor suites included CTD, bio-optics, oxygen optodes, and passive acoustic sensors. Additionally the surface vehicles were equipped with meteorological sensors and cameras. The campaign comprised a range of oceanographic data collection, but had a particular focus on passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammals and oceanographic features, and included development of near-real-time data delivery to operational data users. MASSMO 4 was co-ordinated by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) in partnership with University of East Anglia (UEA), Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) and Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS). The mission was sponsored by Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) and involved close co-operation with the NATO Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE) and UK Royal Navy, and was supported by several additional commercial, government and research partners.

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    This dataset consists of a variety of hydrographic, biogeochemical and meteorological data. Hydrographic profiles, towed and underway measurements and point sources provided information on free-fall turbulence data, current velocities and acoustic backscatter, water column structure including temperature and salinity, the underwater light field, fluorescence and dissolved oxygen. A comprehensive biogeochemical water sampling programme provided details on nutrients, primary productivity, dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton pigments. Biological samples such as zooplankton were obtained from the water column using nets, and from the sea-bed using grabs. Bathymetry and meteorological parameters were measured across the study area. A dye release experiment was also carried out. Data collection was undertaken in the Celtic Sea. The data were collected during the period 02 - 27 July 2008 during RRS James Cook cruise JC025. Measurements were taken using a variety of instrumentation, including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers with attached auxiliary sensors, bathymetric echosounders, water bottle samplers, nets, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), remote access water samplers, towed undulators, free-fall turbulence profilers, temperature loggers, fluorometers, grabs and ship flow-through and meteorological packages. The data have been collected as part of the United Kingdom (UK) Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Oceans 2025 programme (Work Package 3.2) to provide information on vertical mixing processes at the thermocline. This will help improve modelling of these processes and is an expansion of work carried out during a previous National Oceanography Centre Liverpool (NOCL) project ‘Physical-Biological Control of New Production within the Seasonal Thermocline’. The cruise was undertaken jointly by NOCL, the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences (SAMS), the University of Aberdeen, the University of Strathclyde, Napier University and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). The Principal Scientist during the research cruise was Professor Jonathan Sharples of NOCL, who is also the Principal Investigator of Work Package 3.2. CTD data, towed undulator data, temperature logger data, nutrient data, ADCP data, dye tracking data, zooplankton data, primary productivity data and ship underway monitoring system data from this cruise are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Other data have not yet been supplied.

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    Historical sea level data for the Thames region. These data were originally screened as part of an Environment Agency project on extreme sea level in the Thames estuary. Coryton: 1966-1970, 1973-1974 North Woolwich: 1950, 1955-1963, 1965-1967, 1969-1970, 1973-1974 Southend: 1981-1983 Tilbury: 1931-1945, 1960-1961, 1967, 1970, 1984 Tower Pier: 1928-1942, 1944-1945, 1947-1951, 1954-1955, 1958, 1960-1966, 1973

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    The dataset comprises scanned images of historical analogue charts and data ledgers from eight tide gauge sites around the UK. The sites include: Sheerness, Belfast, and several sites around Liverpool managed by the Mersey Docks and Harbour Company namely, Eastham, Gladstone, Hilbre, Princes Pier, Tranmere and Waterloo. The Sheerness ledger data represents some of the earliest records of sea level data in the UK and cover the periods - January 1870 to December 1881, July 1882 to October 1894 and December 1929 to April 1941. Data availability for the other sites are: Belfast analogue charts - 27 November 1901 to 24 May 1902; Princes Pier ledgers: - 1941 to 1950, 1951 to 1960 and 1961 to 1970; Eastham, Gladstone, Hilbre, Princes Pier, Tranmere and Waterloo ledgers: - 1982 to 1988. The data recorded in some of the ledgers also describe meteorological measurements for example, air pressure, air temperature, wind speed and direction, and precipitation and evaporation. Funding to rescue these historical sea level data came from the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) and the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC).These images have now been added to the National Oceanographic Database and are freely available to registered users (subject to licence agreement).

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    The Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS) 'Delayed-mode' Data Assembly Centre at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) quality controls and archives high frequency (i.e. hourly or more frequent) global sea level data and any ancillary measurements (e.g. temperature, wind speed/direction, atmospheric pressure) that are included with the data. The tide gauges are situated on most coastlines, and data cover the Arctic to the Antarctic, and the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans. The main component of GLOSS is the 'Global Core Network' (GCN) of 290 sea level stations around the world for long term climate change and oceanographic sea level monitoring. The Core Network is designed to provide an approximately evenly-distributed sampling. The GLOSS Long Term Trends (LTT) set of gauge sites (some, but not all, of which are in the GCN) are used for monitoring long term trends and accelerations in global sea level. The GLOSS altimeter calibration (ALT) set consists mostly of island stations, and provides a facility for mission intercalibrations. A GLOSS ocean circulation (OC) set, including in particular gauge pairs at straits and in polar area, complements altimetric coverage of the open deep ocean. Data exist from the mid 1800s up to the present day, with particularly long records from Newlyn, U.K.; Brest, France; Prince Rupert, Canada and Honolulu, San Diego and San Francisco, U.S.A.; Sea level has been measured by a variety of different instruments with the historical data mainly coming from mechanical float gauges. More recent technologies include acoustic, pressure, and radar instruments. GLOSS aims at the establishment of high quality global and regional sea level networks to create long‐term sea level records. These records, as well as being used in climate studies (sea level rise), are also used in oceanography (ocean currents, tides, surges), geodesy (national datum), geophysics and geology (coastal land movements) as well as various other disciplines. The programme became known as GLOSS as it provides data for deriving the 'Global Level of the Sea Surface'. GLOSS is an international programme conducted under the auspices of the Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) of the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC). Data are collected by local agencies such as port authorities, universities and navies and sent to or downloaded by the data centre.