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Landmap

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  • Level 1 Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type-L band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data were acquired from ESA by the Landmap project and processed to produce greyscale 8 and 32-bit geotiff imagery for the UK and Republic of Ireland from 2007-2009. The UK data are projected onto the British National Grid whereas the Republic of Ireland data are projected onto the Irish National Grid. PALSAR is an active microwave sensor using L-band (2GHz) frequency and produces various products of different resolutions and performance. PALSAR data can be acquired during day or night, increasing the temporal coverage of data for a particular spatial extent. PALSAR is also unaffected by cloud cover allowing a better coverage of satellite data. PALSAR collects data in 4 different modes. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using these data please also add the following copyright statement: © ESA 2004/2005/2006/2007/2008…. Received and Distributed by University of Manchester under licence from the European Space Agency

  • A Digital Terrain Model (DTM) for most of England and Wales provided by Bluesky and made available via the Landmap service, at 5m resolution. The 5m DTM is a photogrammetrically derived product from stereo aerial photography collected between 1999 and 2008. The aerial photography was captured at a resolution of between 10cm and 25cm. A digital elevation model is a digital model or 3D representation of a terrain's surface and, in contrast to a Digital Surface Model (DSM), represents the bare ground surface without any objects like plants and buildings. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK, part of which was elevation data. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using these data please also add the following copyright statement: © GeoPerspectives supplied by Bluesky yyyy

  • The Building Class data provides detailed information about residential housing types including the house age and structural type. This information can be used for urban regeneration studies, crime monitoring, urban flooding and urban gardens. These data were collected by The GeoInformation Group (TGG), primarily through interpretation of high-resolution aerial photography, as part of the Cities Revealed project. The data were subsequently acquired by the Landmap project. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK, part of which was buildings data. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using these data please also add the following copyright statement: Cities Revealed © The GeoInformation Group yyyy

  • UK coverage at 50cm to 1m resolution for various dates from the 1930s onwards including UK-wide post war surveys from 1946 to 1952, city, county and district wide databases with a variety of film and print archives also available. Small areas of France were also covered. Sources include R.A.F., U.S.A.F. and Luftwaffe. The data were acquired by the Landmap project from The GeoInformation Group's (TGG) Cities Revealed project. Created from original film where possible, sourced from several archives, this database represents the very best of RAF, Luftwaffe and USAF aerial photography flown during 1939 to 1952. Images were then mosaiced together to produce regional coverage for various areas. Close inspection of some of the images will show where the images were created using printed images as printed annotations are visible. While in other cases prints are visible on the margins of the original film shown. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using these data please also add the following copyright statement: Cities Revealed © The GeoInformation Group yyyy

  • Landsat 7 imagery was acquired by the Landmap project from Infoterra. Landsat 7 satellite is equipped with an Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument, developed by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing in Santa Barbara, California. Imagery is available for the whole of the UK from 1999 to 2001 at 15m resolution for the panchromatic and 25m resolution for the band 1-3 and 1-7 GeoTiff images. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using these data please also add the following copyright statements: Copyright University of Manchester/University College London Year 2001. Original Landsat 7 Distributed by Infoterra International.

  • Active Microwave Instrument - Synthetic Aperture Radar (AMI-SAR) data from the European Remote-Sensing satellites 1 and 2 between 1995 and 1999 were acquired by the Landmap project from QinetiQ and are available for large areas of the UK. Data from the individual satellites are available, but also coherence images from when both satellites were operational and orbiting in tandem, which show the difference between two images in the time between both satellites passing over (around 1 day). The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using these data please also add the following copyright statement: Original ERS data ERS data copyright ESA 1999/2000 (year of acquisition). Received and Distributed by QinetiQ under licence from the European Space Agency

  • The Kinematic GPS (KGPS) data provide accurate high-resolution locational data of approximately 6400 km of roads in Great Britain using circular and/or linear transect data collected during two fieldwork campaigns (details below) carried out by the Landmap project team in order to validate the various Landmap image and elevation products. When processed, this data yields accurate 3-D coordinates that can be used for quality assessment purposes. Kinematic GPS is a technique used to enhance the precision of standard GPS, using a reference receiver of known location, such as a main road, to make corrections to the standard GPS-determined location yielding centimetre-level accuracy. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK, part of which was buildings data. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. Campaign 1 The first campaign, carried out in September 1999, required the kinematic GPS profiles for a number of pre-defined circular routes. This suited a 'Real-time Kinematic' (RTK-GPS) survey technique in which both GPS code pseudorange and carrier-phase measurements are recorded. This method is capable of yielding sub-decimetre accuracy over short baselines, generally less than 50 km. The observing schedule was such that the reference receiver was established at a location deemed to be the centroid of the day's route so that the baseline distances from the 'local' reference receiver to mobile receiver would be kept to a minimum preventing the accumulation of distance-dependent errors. The mobile receiver would then be driven along the predefined route recording satellite observations at a rate of 5 Hz. Once the route was completed, the local reference station team was picked up and the entire team prepared to observe the next scheduled loop. The mobile team covered almost 4,000 miles during the 14 days of the first campaign with the predefined circular routes representing some 2,800 miles (4,506km) of that total. Campaign 2 The second campaign which took place during May and June of 2000 was geared to a different set of objectives and therefore had an observing schedule different to that of the first campaign. There was a requirement to observe some long GPS profiles that would essentially span a number of satellite-pass strips / several stereo-pair strips permitting some checking of the strip matching procedures using orthorectification techniques. The establishment of a 'local' reference receiver station alongside each section of these proposed transects would have been too demanding in both time and logistics so an alternative processing approach was decided upon. The observing procedure was identical to that of the first campaign with the exception that the 'local' reference receiver remained in the same location for the duration of the campaign. A high-precision geodetic GPS receiver was established at a point of known co-ordinates at University College London where it collected GPS observations for the 9 days of this second campaign. The mobile receiver was driven along the required profiles recording data at a rate of 5Hz. The routes followed for this second campaign contained a number of features as requested by the SPOT processing team that would aid them in their orthorectification tasks. One particular request was that a number of crossovers should be performed at major junctions whereby a mile or two of additional observations were taken on the feeder roads for the junction in question. Such manoeuvres provide the processing / imaging team with a greater number of features to identity and refer to as part of their orthorectification quality assessment routines. The nature of the road network in some areas meant that several long stretches of road were retraced or intersected which allowed some error checking.

  • A Digital Terrain Model (DTM) for most of Scotland provided by GetMapping and made available via the Landmap service, at 5m resolution. The 5m DTM is a photogrammetrically derived product from stereo aerial photography collected between 1999 and 2008. The aerial photography was captured at a resolution of between 10cm and 25cm. A digital elevation model is a digital model or 3D representation of a terrain's surface and, in contrast to a Digital Surface Model (DSM), represents the bare ground surface without any objects like plants and buildings. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK, part of which was elevation data. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using these data please also add the following copyright statement: © GetMapping yyyy

  • Near InfraRed red-edge imagery for Northern Ireland from 2009 to 2011 was acquired by the Landmap project from RapidEye. The imagery has a spatial resolution of 6.5metres and contains 5 spectral bands. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC.

  • Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data was collected by The Geoinformation Group using LiDAR-equipped survey aircraft for the main urban conurbations of England and Wales (including London, Manchester, Birmingham, Liverpool, Newcastle, Edinburgh and Glasgow) as part of the Cities Revealed project, and made available through the Landmap service. The GeoInformation Group (TGG) has processed the data so that they are available as Digital Terrain Models (ground surface only) and Digital Surface/Elevation Models (the ground and all features on it), both geographic databases with height and surface measurement information in the form of regular grids with intervals of 1 or 2 m. In addition, some First Pass and Last Pass data are available. The First Pass data provides height values for the top of the canopy (i.e. buildings, trees etc.) while the Last Pulse data provides height values for the bottom of the canopy and provides information about the shape of the terrain. The data are available in img format. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK, part of which was elevation data. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. When using the data please also add the following copyright statement: Cities Revealed © The GeoInformation Group yyyy