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  • Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica. An animated time series plot of 64 profiles of ice base and surface elevation along a flowline based on the mean flow direction. The flowline passes through a region of large elevation change that took place between 2014 and 2017. The work was funded by NERC projects NE/P011365/1 and NE/S006605/1

  • A new version of this dataset exists. To see the last version of the Antarctic Digital Database, have a look here: https://data.bas.ac.uk/collections/e74543c0-4c4e-4b41-aa33-5bb2f67df389/ Coastline for Antarctica created from various mapping and remote sensing sources, consisting of the following coast types: ice coastline, rock coastline, grounding line, ice shelf and front, ice rumple, and rock against ice shelf. Covering all land and ice shelves south of 60S. Suitable for topographic mapping and analysis. This dataset has been generalised from the high resolution vector polyline. Medium resolution versions of ADD data are suitable for scales smaller than 1:1,000,000, although certain regions will appear more detailed than others due to variable data availability and coastline characteristics. Changes in v7.7 include updates Brunt Ice Shelf, ice fronts on the east side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers and the ice fronts and coastline around Charcot Island. Data quality checks were also performed to ensure existing features were categorised correctly around Getz Ice Shelf. Data compiled, managed and distributed by the Mapping and Geographic Information Centre and the UK Polar Data Centre, British Antarctic Survey on behalf of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research.

  • In 2008 RRS James Clark Ross investigated the marine benthic biodiversity in Amundsen Sea and in 2018 the marine benthic biodiversity of the Prince Gustav Channel (PGC) area and the macrobenthic cumacean fauna (Peracarida, Crustacea) collected by epibenthic sledge (EBS) has been assessed for species richness, abundance and assemblage composition. In total 4431 cumacean specimens assigned to 58 morphospecies and 5 families were identified. To set the cumacean dataset into a wider context, published cumacean species richness and abundance data from EBS collected stations in the Magellan Region and Southern Ocean (Rehm et al 2007, Muehlenhardt-Siegel 1999, Cordoba & San Vincente 2009) were added. This dataset provides data for 1) Amundsen Sea and PGC EBS locations, 2) Amundsen Sea and PGC EBS cumacean abundances, 3) Magellan Region and Southern Ocean EBS cumacean standardised 1000 m trawl length abundances (175 - 3500 m depth). Funding for the expeditions and KL was provided by NERC NC Science for the BAS core project BIOPEARL and for NERC urgency grant NE/R012296/1 ''Benthic biodiversity under Antarctic ice-shelves - baseline assessment of the seabed exposed by the 2017 calving of the Larsen-C Ice Shelf''. Funding for DD was provided by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft grant Br1121/51-1.

  • The files include full analytical details and datasets from the laboratories used for the acquisition of U-Pb zircon geochronology, Lu-Hf isotope geochemistry and 40Ar/39Ar analysis of detrital white mica. Also included are a list of all the published datasets used in the construction of the MDS and ridge plots for detailed regional comparisons. The data were collected in the interval January 2021 to March 2022 across a number of laboratories: Stockholm, University College London, British Geological Survey, Trinity College Dublin, Australian National University (U-Pb zircon geochronology); Open University (40Ar/39Ar analysis) and British Geological Survey (Lu-Hf isotopes). The analyses were conducted by Teal Riley (Stockholm, British Geological Survey), Ian Millar (Australian National University), Andrew Carter (University College London), Joaquin Bastias (Trinity College Dublin), Craig Storey (Open University). The analyses were conducted to examine the provenance and depositional history of the accretionary LeMay Group complex of Alexander Island.

  • The dataset contains terminus positions and flowlines of the Vincennes Bay Outlet Glaciers, for the years 1963-2022. These are provided as shapefiles, associated with a paper submitted to The Cryosphere entitled Extensive and anomalous grounding line retreat at Vanderford Glacier, Vincennes Bay, Wilkes Land, East Antarctica (Picton et al., 2023). The dataset is divided into three separate folders: (i) flowlines, (ii) sampling boxes, and (iii) terminus positions. The flowlines and sampling boxes, shown in Figure 1B (Picton et al., 2023), were used to facilitate data collection. The terminus positions represent annual terminus positions manually digitised from satellite imagery. Flowlines, sampling boxes and terminus positions are provided for each of the Vincennes Bay outlet glaciers: Vanderford, Adams, Anzac, Bond East, Bond West, and Underwood. Chris Stokes and Stewart Jamieson acknowledge funding from the UK Natural Environment Research Council grant NE/R000824/1.

  • We present here the Bedmap1 ice thickness, bed and surface elevation standardised CSV data points that were used to create the Bedmap1 gridding products. The data consists of 2 million data points acquired in Antarctica from 1960s to 2000. The associated Bedmap datasets are listed here: https://www.bas.ac.uk/project/bedmap/#data This work is supported by the SCAR Bedmap project and the British Antarctic Survey''s core programme: National Capability - Polar Expertise Supporting UK Research

  • During the austral summer of 2015/16, a major international collaboration funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and with in-kind contribution from the British Antarctic Survey, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF), acquired ~38,000 line km of aerogeophysical data. The primary objective of the POLARGAP campaign was to carry out an airborne gravity survey covering the southern polar gap of the ESA gravity field mission GOCE, beyond the coverage of the GOCE orbit (south of 83.5degS), however aeromagnetics and ice-penetrating radar data were also opportunistically acquired. This survey covers the South Pole and Recovery Lakes, as well as parts of the Support Force, Foundation and Recovery Glaciers. Our Twin Otter aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, an air-sea gravity meter, and a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN-2). We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data. NOTE: Please note that an issue with the floats in the NetCDF variable "UTC_time_layerData" has resulted in this variable having rounded up decimal numbers. In order to fix this issue, we advise users who need this variable to download the separately published bed pick data for the POLARGAP survey (doi: https://doi.org/10.5285/d55e87dd-a74d-4182-be99-93ab805103ab) and use the ''DateTime_YYYY-MM-DD_HH:MM:SS.S'' column which is the same as the one used to produce the NetCDF.

  • The datasets consist of three csv files containing: (i) the numbers of DNA reads of 415 operational taxonomic units of fungi in 64 plots of a soil warming experiment sampled in 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012, (ii) the taxonomic placements of the fungi and (iii) the treatments applied to the plots. The research was funded by an Antarctic Funding Initiative grant from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NE/D00893X/1), a NERC GW4+ Doctoral Training Partnership studentship (grant number NE/L002434/1), NERC core funding to the British Antarctic Survey Long Term Monitoring and Survey programme, and monies derived from the University in Svalbard Arctic Mycology course (for which reference numbers are not available).

  • This dataset contains the position and depth (ice thickness) of three spatially-extensive Internal Reflecting Horizons (IRHs) mapped from ice-penetrating radar data acquired with the British Antarctic Survey''s PASIN and PASIN2 ice radar systems across central East Antarctica. The dataset extends geographically from Dome A to South Pole. Using previous dated IRHs from Winter et al (2019), an independent validation of IRH ages from the South Pole ice-core chronology and a 1-D steady-state model, we assigned ages to our three IRHs: (H1) 38.5 +/- 2.2 ka, (H2) 90.4 +/- 3.57, and (H3) 161.9 +/- 6.76 ka. This study was motivated by the AntArchitecture Action Group of the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR). The project was supported by the National Environmental Research Council (NERC)-funded ONE Planet Doctoral Training Partnership (NE/S007512/1), hosted jointly by Newcastle and Northumbria Universities. The authors thank the BAS science and logistics teams for acquiring both the AGAP PASIN and PolarGAP PASIN2 data which is fully available on the Polar Airborne Geophysics Data Portal of the UK Polar Data Center (https://www.bas.ac.uk/project/nagdp/). BedMachine (version 2) data are available at https://doi.org/10.5067/E1QL9HFQ7A8M.

  • A dataset of ice-margin change (advance/recession) at the south-western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet, comprising data from 3325 terrestrial, 439 lacustrine and 35 marine ice-margins respectively. The dataset also comprises measures of ice-marginal lake parameters including area and intersect (length of the lake - ice-margin interface). Measurements were made at approximately five year intervals (epochs) from 1987 to 2015. The ice sheet margin and adjacent ice-marginal lakes were delineated by applying the Normalised Difference Snow Index (NDSI) and the Normalised Difference Water Index (NDWI) respectively to Landsat TM, ETM+ and OLI scenes. Ice-margin changes were measured relative to a series of fixed reference points. The dataset was generated to facilitate comparison of changes at the disparate ice-marginal environments of the ice sheet and investigate temporal patterns of ice-margin recession. The dataset was created and processed by researchers in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds and the Institute of Integrative Biology at the University of Liverpool.