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  • Coastline for Antarctica created from various mapping and remote sensing sources, consisting of the following coast types: ice coastline, rock coastline, grounding line, ice shelf and front, ice rumple, and rock against ice shelf. Covering all land and ice shelves south of 60S. Suitable for topographic mapping and analysis. High resolution versions of ADD data are suitable for scales larger than 1:1,000,000. The largest suitable scale is changeable and dependent on the region. Major changes in v7.5 include updates to ice shelf fronts in the following regions: Seal Nunataks and Scar Inlet region, the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf, between the Brunt Ice Shelf and Riiser-Larsen Peninsula, the Shackleton and Conger ice shelves, and Crosson, Thwaites and Pine Island. Small areas of grounding line and ice coastlines were also updated in some of these regions as needed. Data compiled, managed and distributed by the Mapping and Geographic Information Centre and the UK Polar Data Centre, British Antarctic Survey on behalf of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research.

  • This dataset captures information on the diet composition and mass of Adelie penguin stomach contents at Signy Island, from 1997 to 2020. The monitoring period occurred over four weeks each year and involved sampling adults returning to feed their chicks during the creche period. Sampling took place approximately every five days. Numbers of birds sampled on each occasion varied over the entire period of the dataset from a maximum of eight to a minimum of six, equating to an annual maximum of forty birds and an annual minimum of thirty, depending on the year. All adult penguins were sampled on their return to the colony using the stomach lavage methodology specified in CCAMLR (Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources) Ecosystem Monitoring Program (CEMP) Standard Methods A8A. The stomach samples were then weighed and categorised into krill, cephalopods, fish and non-food and identified to species level where possible. Krill carapaces and otoliths were removed and measured. Ecosystems component of BAS Polar Science for Planet Earth Programme, funded by NERC.

  • The dataset comprises ApRES (Autonomous phase-sensitive Radio Echo Sounder) time series from four sites (G1-4) through the grounding zone of the eastern Thwaites ice shelf. The instruments were deployed in early 2020 and recovered in early 2021 as part of the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration (ITGC) MELT project. The aim was to provide time series of basal melt rates and the vertical strain rate at each site. The ApRES DAT files were converted to netCDF for publication. Each burst in an ApRES file maps straightforwardly to a group in the corresponding netCDF file. This is a lossless, reversible process. The data were acquired under funding from ITGC: NE/S006656/1.

  • This dataset comprises lists of fossil species from a polar region (Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula) and two tropical regions (Western Europe and US Gulf Coast) during the Early Cenozoic era. The dataset begins in the Late Maastrichtian epoch of the Cretaceous period, extends across the mass extinction event at the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, and terminates in the late Middle Eocene (i.e., a timespan of some 30 Myr from approximately 70 to 40 Ma ago). The lists are based on four of the commonest types of fossil found at the time: two of these are bivalve molluscs and two are gastropod molluscs. Within each group (or taxonomic clade), the fossils are listed by family, starting with the taxonomically most primitive and ending with the most recent (or derived). Both genus and species names are given. The data were collected in various stages between 2009 and 2021. These lists were used to compare patterns of mass extinction across the K/Pg boundary and then subsequent evolutionary radiation of these four groups through the first 25 Myr of the Cenozoic era. Full details of this study are given in: Crame, J.A. & McGowan, A. J. In press. Origin of the tropical-polar biodiversity contrast. Global Ecology and Biogeography. This project was funded partly through NERC grant NE/I005803/1 and partly through BAS/NERC core funds.

  • This dataset captures information on the diet composition and mass of gentoo penguin stomach contents at Signy Island, from 1998 to 2010. The monitoring period occurred over four weeks each year and involved sampling adults returning to feed their chicks during the creche period. Sampling took place approximately every five days. Numbers of birds sampled on each occasion varied over the entire period of the dataset from a maximum of eight to a minimum of six, equating to an annual maximum of forty birds and annual minimum of thirty, depending on the year. All adult penguins were sampled on their return to the colony using the stomach lavage methodology specified in CCAMLR CEMP Standard Methods A8A. The stomach samples were then weighed and categorised into krill, cephalopods, fish and non-food and identified to species level where possible. Krill carapaces and otoliths were removed and measured. Ecosystems component of BAS Polar Science for Planet Earth Programme, funded by NERC.

  • We present Curie depth point (CDP) and geothermal heat flow (GHF) estimations based on spectral analysis of magnetic airborne data for the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and Wilkes Subglacial Basin area. The Curie depth point is defined as the depth at which the Curie Temperature of 580 degC is reached. The Curie Temperature describes the temperature at which magnetic minerals lose their ability to generate a strong magnetic field. We use exclusively high resolution magnetic airborne measurements from the ADMAP-2 compilation, where we have removed data with a 15 km blanking distance threshold to reported flight lines to minimise artefact from interpolation. The obtained magnetic dataset is upward continued to a constant station height of 4 km and subdivided into window with a window size of 200 km, 300 km, and 400 km. For each window we calculate the power spectrum and estimate the CDP from the power spectrum. Subsequently we estimate the magnetic data coverage for each window and discard CDP estimates for window below a data coverage threshold of 80%. From the CDP interface GHF is forward calculated assuming constant thermal conductivity for the crust and a constant temperature at the base of the ice sheet representing the pressure melting point. This study is motivated by the need of high resolution GHF models form the Icesheet modelling community especially in marine based Basins like the Wilkes Subglacial Basin as well as by interpretation of the origin of the Transantarctic Mountains. Recent seismic studies have argued that warmer west Antarctic is present beneath the Transantarctic Mountains, which give thermal support to the mountains range. This hypothesis should lead to increased GHF in the area and therefore can be tested against our GHF model. Our results show elevated heat flow in the area of the Transantarctic mountains supporting the idea of thermal support for the mountain range with an independent method. Furthermore, we image elevate heat flow in the central Basin of the Wilks Subglacial Basin and Rennick Graben which have not been imaged before by continent wide GHF models. Funding for this research was provided by NERC through a SENSE CDT studentship (NE/T00939X/1)

  • We can learn about the flow of ice in Antarctica by evaluating the key parameters that control the flow speed. These parameters include the basal drag coefficient and the ice viscosity. They can be estimated by adjusting their values so that model velocities at the upper surface agree with satellite observations. This dataset was produced using inverse methods to obtain the parameter values. In this approach a cost function that describes the mismatch between model and satellite data is minimised iteratively by making small adjustments to the parameters at each iteration to improve the fit. The result is better information about the flow field in the Antarctic ice sheet. Once the flow field is available it can be used as an initial state from which begin temporally evolving simulations using the model. A number of different examples are included to show how varying different parameters alters the temporally evolving simulations. The contributing datasets used to constrain the model are listed by Arthern et al (2015) and Arthern and Williams (2017). Multidecadal model simulations span up to 100 years of simulation time. This work was funded by NERC standard grant NE/L005212/1.

  • The dataset consists of 14 selected lines of radar data, collected from the Little Dome C region close to Concordia Station in East Antarctica. The data were collected in austral field seasons 2016-17, and 2017-18, from within the search region for the planned European project Beyond EPICA - Oldest Ice, an EU-funded 10-nation consortium project to drill an ice core that spans up to 1.5 million years of climate and atmospheric history. Radar lines were recorded using the BAS DELORES sledge-borne, over-snow, ice radar system and geolocated with a precise GPS system. This data was generated within the project Beyond EPICA - Oldest Ice (BE-OI). The project has received funding from the European Union''s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 730258 (BE-OI CSA). It has received funding from the Swiss State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation (SERI) under contract number 16.0144. It is further supported by national partners and funding agencies in Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the UK. Logistic support is mainly provided by AWI, BAS, ENEA and IPEV. Collection of this data also benefited from support by the joint French-Italian Concordia Programme, which established and runs the permanent station Concordia at Dome C. We particularly acknowledge those who collected the data in the field, and assisted with the processing: Robert Mulvaney, Massimo Frezzotti, Marie Cavitte, Ed King, Carlos Martin, Catherine Ritz, Julius Rix.

  • We present here the land cover classification across West Antarctica and the McMurdo Dry Valley produced from Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) images of six proglacial regions of Antarctica at 30 m resolution, with an overall accuracy of 77.0 % for proglacial land classes. We conducted this classification using an unsupervised K-means clustering approach, which circumvented the need for training data and was highly effective at picking up key land classes, such as vegetation, water, and different sedimentary surfaces. This work is supported by the Leeds-York-Hull Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) Panorama under grant NE/S007458/1. The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic project VAN 1/2022 and the Czech Antarctic Foundation funded fieldwork that contributed to part of this work.

  • This datasets captures the body mass, bill length and bill depth of adult chinstrap penguins immediately after their arrival to Signy Island at the start of the annual breeding from 1996 to 2020. Penguins arriving at the beach were measured for bill length, depth, and body mass before being released where they were captured. These measurements were made in mid/late November, as chinstrap penguins arrive for the austral summer. This monitoring contributes to the CCAMLR (Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources) Ecosystem Monitoring Program (CEMP) and is part of the annual seabird Long Term Monitoring carried out by the British Antarctic Survey at Signy Island. Ecosystems component of BAS Polar Science for Planet Earth Programme, funded by NERC.