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National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool

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  • The dataset consists of northward and eastward baroclinic and barotropic current vectors derived from a 40 year run of the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System (POLCOMS) numerical model, run from 01 January 1964 to 31 December 2004. The dataset consists of 41 data files in Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant NetCDF format. The data are supplied as a gridded dataset covering the entire northwest European continental shelf and extending out into the Atlantic Ocean. The grid resolution varies from 7.8 km to 14.2 km along the longitudinal axis and is at 12.3 km on the latitudinal axis. The model contains 40 depth layers. The model run was from 01 January 1964 to 31 December 2004. The barotropic currents were generated every 20 seconds, while the baroclinic currents were generated every 300 seconds. These generated currents were then averaged over a 25 hour tidal cycle to remove tidal current influence from the data. The dataset consists of 41 data files in Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant NetCDF format. The model simulations were run on the HECTOR supercomputer managed by the University of Edinburgh. The data were generated by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) Liverpool as part of Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) National Capability (NC) funding looking at multi-decadal variability and trends in temperature of the northwest European continental shelf.

  • This dataset consists of biogeochemical parameters of nitrate, phosphate, oxygen, chlorophyll-a and phytoplankton concentrations, net primary productivity and attenuation generated by the POLCOMS-ERSEM coupled hydrodynamic-ecosystem model. The modelled dataset is from the Atlantic Margin Model (AMM) implementation, extending from 40.1 to 64.9 degrees latitude north and from 19.9 degrees longitude west to 13 degrees longitude east. The dataset is on a latitude/longitude grid with latitudinal resolution of 12.3 km and longitudinal resolution between 7.8 km and 14.2 km. The data are available as monthly averages saved in annual files for the 38 year period from January 1967 to December 2004. The dataset was generated by the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System (POLCOMS) and the Plymouth Marine Laboratory European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). This work is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) National Capability funding in order to investigate the biogeochemical factors which affect primary production in the northwest European continental shelf. The dataset was generated by the UK National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool. The dataset consists of 38 data files in Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant NetCDF format. More information about the modelled data set and its applications can be found in Holt et al. (2012).

  • This dataset consists of model outputs from ensemble simulations of an idealised Southern Ocean using a quasi-geotrophic model called Q-GCM. As such, there are no calendar dates associated with it. Two models were generated: Initial Condition Perturbation Ensemble (ICPE) experiments model output covers years 162-168 of the simulation; Boundary Condition Perturbation Ensemble (BCPE) experiments model output covers years 150-180 of the simulation. The models created form the practical element of the NERC project ‘The structure and stability of transport and fixing barriers within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current’. The project aims to quantify the relationship between Southern Ocean winds, the eddy saturation mechanism and the branch-like structure of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The work was funded by means of a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Discovery Science New Investigators Grant ‘NE/I001794/1’. The grant ran from 02 August 2010 to 21 September 2012 and was led by Dr. Chris Wilson at the UK’s National Oceanography Centre (NOC). The model simulation data were submitted to the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) for archive and are stored in the originator format.

  • The dataset consists of temperature, salinity and sea surface height data generated from a 40 year run of the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System (POLCOMS) numerical model. The dataset consists of 41 data files in Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant NetCDF format. The data are supplied as a gridded dataset covering the entire northwest European continental shelf and extending out into the Atlantic Ocean. The grid resolution varies from 7.8 km to 14.2 km along the longitudinal axis and is at 12.3 km on the latitudinal axis. The model contains 40 depth layers. The model run was from 01 January 1964 to 31 December 2004 and the generated data were averaged over a 25 hour tidal cycle to create daily mean values. The data were generated from the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System (POLCOMS) numerical model. The model simulations were run on the HECTOR supercomputer managed by the University of Edinburgh. The dataset was generated to look at multi-decadal variability and trends in temperature of the northwest European continental shelf. The data were generated by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) Liverpool as part of Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) National Capability (NC) funding.

  • The RAPID-AMOC (Rapid Climate Change - Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation) data set consists of pressure, current velocities, temperature, salinity, density, oxygen, alkalinity, pH, PCO2 and inorganic carbon time series. Measurements are collected by moored instruments deployed in arrays across the Atlantic at approximately 26.5N for the Monitoring the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at 26.5N (MOC) project and the Atlantic BiogeoChemical Fluxes (ABC Fluxes) project. The data set also consists of conductivity- temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, and ships' underway monitoring system meteorology and surface hydrography collected during the mooring deployment and servicing cruises. The RAPID-AMOC data set follows on from the original Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) Programme oceanographic dataset and the RAPID-WATCH dataset. It spans data collected from 2015 to the present and is intended to continue to collect data until approximately 2020. The main aims of the RAPID-AMOC Programme are to provide oceanographic measurements that continue the long time series of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation to be derived for use in climate change research. The MOC and ABC Fluxes projects are led by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton.

  • Data were collected in 2017, to provide information on spatial patterns of dune migration rates and associated water flow characteristics, at locations on the South Saskatchewan River, Canada. Dune migration rates were measured using repeat aerial imagery. Bedform crests were digitised in individual images, and average dune migration rates were calculated from the mean migration distance between image pairs, divided by the time between image collection. Water depth and velocity data were collected using a Sontek M9 acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) mounted on a small zodiac boat. The position of the aDcp was recorded using a RTK dGPS system. Data were collected on 12th June 2017 as part of NERC project NE/L00738X/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/864434b7-2102-4edc-802d-ebdbfe9ff766

  • The cross-disciplinary themes will result in a diverse data catalogue. The ship collected data will be in the form of sea surface meteorology (2-D wind speed and direction, total irradiance, Photosynthetically Active Radiation/PAR, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity); atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2); biological, chemical and physical properties and processes in the marine photic zone (carbonate chemistry - pCO2, total alkalinity, pH, DIC; dissolved gases - oxygen; nutrient concentrations, ammonium regeneration, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, zooplankon ecology, chlorophyll concentration, photosynthetic pigment composition, bacterial production, phytoplankton and bacterial speciation, concentrations of biogenic trace compounds such as dimethyl sulphide/DMS and dimthylsulphoniopropionate/DMSP, salinity, temperature, zooplankon ecology) and bioassays of these same parameters under different future IPCC CO2 and temperature scenarios. The long-term (18 month) laboratory based mesocosm experiments will include data on individual organism response (growth, immune response, reproductive fitness) under different future IPCC CO2 and temperature scenarios in rocky intertidal, soft sediment and calcareous biogenic habitats, as well as the effects on commercially important species of fish and shellfish. The analysis of sediment cores will provide greater resolution of the paleo record during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Data will be used to aid the parameterisation of coastal and continental shelf seas (Northern Europe and the Arctic) model runs as well as larger scale global models. The shipboard fieldwork will take place around the UK, in the Arctic Ocean and the Southern Ocean. The mesocosms will look at temperate marine species common to UK shelf seas. Sediment cores have been collected from Tanzania. The models will look from the coastal seas of Northern Europe to the whole globe. Data to be generated will include data collected at sea, short-term (2-3 day) ship-board bioassays, from long-term (18 month) laboratory based mesocosm experiments and reconstructed paleo records from sediment cores. The 5 year UK Ocean Acidification Research Programme is the UK’s response to growing concerns over ocean acidification. Aims: 1 - to reduce uncertainties in predictions of carbonate chemistry changes and their effects on marine biogeochemistry, ecosystems and other components of the Earth System; 2 - to understand the responses to ocean acidification, and other climate change related stressors, by marine organisms, biodiversity and ecosystems and to improve understanding of their resistance or susceptibility to acidification; 3 - to provide data and effective advice to policy makers and managers of marine bioresources on the potential size and timescale of risks, to allow for development of appropriate mitigation and adaptation strategies. The study unites over 100 marine scientists from 27 institutions across the UK. It is jointly funded by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC).