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  • Surface melt onset, duration and end date for the Antarctic Peninsula from 1999/2000 to 2016/2017 at a spatial resolution of 2 km, derived from scatterometer data. Years 1999/2000 to 2008/09 are based on QSCAT data and 2009/10 to 2016/17 on ASCAT data.

  • This dataset represents model output from 4 simulations of Store Glacier produced using the Elmer/Ice glacier model equipped with novel 3D calving subroutines. As described in the paper associated with this dataset (Todd et al., JGR, 2018), the model is initialised with velocity observations and then forced with present day environmental forcing. The simulation covers a 5 year time period with no fixed dates. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/K500884/1.

  • A record of the oxygen-isotope ratios and net accumulation from an ice core drilled on Dyer Plateau in the Antarctic Peninsula is presented. This 233 m long ice core was drilled in the southern summer season of 1989/90. The isotope data covers the years 1505 to 1988. The snow accumulation data covers 1840 to 1988.

  • The data consists of 30 minute observations recorded by an automatic weather station (iWS 18) in Cabinet Inlet on Larsen C Ice Shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula. The iWS consists of a custom-built weather station unit, assembled at the Institute of Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht (IMAU). There are sensors for air temperature, surface air pressure, relative humidity, as well as a gps, an acoustic snow height sensor, an ARGOS communication antenna, and three Lithium batteries that fuel the unit when solar radiation is absent. The unit is complemented by a propeller-vane Young anemometer measuring wind direction and speed. Additionally, all radiation fluxes are measured with a Kipp and Zonen CNR4 radiometer. This dataset runs from November 2014 to January 2017. Funded was provided by the NERC grant NE/L005409/1. ***** PLEASE BE ADVISED TO USE VERSION 2.0 DATA ***** The VERSION 2.0 data set (see ''Related Data Set Metadata'' link below) has an additional 10 months of measurements.

  • These are vertical density profiles of snow, firn and ice reconstructed from the vertical luminosity trace of digital optical televiewer (OPTV) logs of five boreholes drilled by hot water to ~100 m depth in Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Boreholes were drilled in austral summers of 2014 and 2015 in order to investigate the internal properties of the ice shelf, and specifically the influence of surface melting and melt pond formation on those properties. These data are part of the NERC-funded MIDAS (''Impact of surface melt and ponding on ice shelf dynamics and stability'') research project, with grant references NE/L006707/1 and NE/L005409/1. The associated borehole OPTV logs and temperature profiles are also available, as are other MIDAS datasets.

  • From May 2009 to May 2013, seven dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed along a 120 km-long transect in the south-west of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Two additional dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed perpendicular to longitudinal ice flow at ~14 km inland: one 5 km distant from June 2011 to May 2013, and another 2.5 km distance from May 2012 to May 2013. Each receiver recorded position observations every 10 seconds or 30 seconds (depending on configuration), enabling resolution of horizontal and vertical ice motion. Sites were powered by solar panels and operated 24 hours a day during summer but shut down in the autumn. Absolute ice displacements at each site were obtained for each summer and winter period in the absence of continuous measurements. Position measurements were kinematically corrected relative to an off-ice base station using TRACK (Chen, 1999). Daily velocities were then obtained by differencing across 24-hour periods, whilst continuous velocities were obtained through application of a sliding 6-hour differencing window. At each GPS site we also measured (1) the near-surface air temperature every 15 minutes year-round, (2) net seasonal ablation using ablation stakes, and (3) at several selected sites melt rates using sonic ranging sensors. This version 2 of the dataset updates the previously 2-day temporal resolution of the ice motion records to 1-day resolution. In other respects the dataset has not changed. Funded by NERC, the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland and The University of Edinburgh. Relevant grants: NE/F021399/1, NE/H024964/1 Studentships: NE/I52830X/1, NE/J500021/1, NE/H526794/1

  • This dataset documents the trends and variability in the latitude and strength of the belt of lower-atmosphere westerly winds over the Southern Ocean, referred to as the ''westerly jet''. Time series of annual mean and seasonal diagnostics are available for the period 1979-present, specifically time series of seasonal and annual mean jet latitude and strength. The diagnostics are derived from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim reanalysis (for more information see www.ecmwf.int and Dee et al. (2011)), which is an observationally-constrained reconstruction of atmospheric conditions. The broad characterisation of the westerly winds into these simple diagnostics has been found to be useful for understanding long-term climate change due to contrasting drivers of change and impacts on other aspects of the climate system. This is an index of winds around the full circumference of all longitudes at Southern Hemisphere middle latitudes. The exact latitude depends on the position of the jet at any given time, but on average the jet (the core of the westerlies) is located at approximately 52 deg S.

  • The datasets are temperature time series from strings of thermistors, each located at a discrete depth within one of six boreholes drilled to a depth of ~100 m in the northern sector of Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Supporting borehole information is presented by Ashmore and others (2017). These data are part of the NERC-funded MIDAS (''Impact of surface melt and ponding on ice shelf dynamics and stability'') research project, with grant references NE/L006707/1 and NE/L005409/1. Associated (near-surface) borehole temperature records, OPTV logs and density records are also available, as are other MIDAS datasets.

  • Meteorological data collected on Larsen Ice Shelf including pressure, temperature, wind speed and direction.

  • These two files (.csv) provide independent methods of quantifying subglacial roughness in Greenland, both calculated from radio-echo sounding (or ice penetrating radar) data collected by the Operation Ice Bridge programme using CReSIS instrumentation. They are an output of the Basal Properties of Greenland (BPOG) project (http://bpog.blogs.ilrt.org/), with funding from NERC grant NE/M000869/1. Roughness here, and in the wider literature, is defined as the variation in bed elevation (in the vertical) at the ice-bed interface, over a given length-scale. These two metrics calculate/quantify this variation in different ways: one shows topographic-scale roughness, calculated from the variation in along-track topography (bed elevation measurements derived from the radar pulse); and the other shows scattering-derived roughness, calculated from quantifying characteristics of each bed-echo (the return from the radar pulse at the ice-bed interface).