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University of Salford

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  • Data comprise audio files captured using a Wildlife Acoustics SM3 Songmeter located on an overgrown unpaved road close to several abandoned houses with deciduous trees (including fruit trees in former gardens) in the abandoned village of Buryakovka in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, Ukraine. A single continuous recording of twelve hours of audio from midday until midnight on the 25th June 2015 was manually annotated by an expert (using Raven Pro interactive sound analysis software). The dataset comprises the resultant five wave files (stereo .wav sampled at 48 kHz) and five annotation files (text files with the same name as the associated wave file). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/be5639e9-75e9-4aa3-afdd-65ba80352591

  • Data comprise morphometric measurements, sex determination, maturity and immunological analysis of blood pathogens from wild field voles (Microtus agrestis) in Kielder Forest, Northumberland, UK in 2015-17. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e5854431-6fa4-4ff0-aa02-3de68763c952

  • [This dataset is embargoed until November 5, 2022]. The data presented here comprise a catalogue of 61736 camera trap images obtained during the period June - November 2020 (this period is described within the dataset as 'setup 1'). Following the explosion at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986, a 5000 km2 exclusion zone surrounding the plant was created; people and farm animals were subsequently evacuated from the area. In April 2020 there were severe wildfires within the Ukrainian part of the exclusion zone (2600 km2) where approximately 870 km2 was burnt. The NERC-funded CHAR project conducted a study which involved placing motion activated digital camera traps at three sites (each covering an area of 80 km2) within the Ukrainian exclusion zone from June 2020 - August 2021 to assess large mammal activity following the fire. Thirteen cameras were randomly located at each site; all camera deployment locations had been used in a previous study 2014-2015 (https://tree.ceh.ac.uk/content/chernobyl-webcams). All the images obtained during June - November 2020 are included as part of the dataset with the exception of those images containing people, vehicles or members of the CHAR research team setting up and servicing the cameras; these images have been catalogued but they are not included in the dataset to protect privacy. Information on camera deployment periods, site characteristics and descriptions of each camera location (e.g. geographic coordinates, estimates of ambient dose rate, description of animal trails or tracks and the extent of fire damage in vicinity of where the camera is mounted) have also been included as part of the dataset. Staff from the Chornobyl Center for Nuclear Safety deployed, maintained and downloaded information from the cameras and provided field notes and observations of habitat. UKCEH staff populated the dataset using the information provided. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9bd7754d-ea87-4b35-bec1-f39d5cc76db6

  • This dataset reports results on seedling growth and survival for two hyphal exclusion experiments in a subtropical forest. The data include survival status, height, total biomass and the biomass of component plant parts, percentage root colonisation by mycorrhizas, for tree seedlings of ten common species including five ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and five arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) species, which were transplanted in the in-growth cores with windows covering different sizes of nylon meshes (35 vs. 0.5 µm). The dataset provides raw data on growth and survival metrics for each seedling, plus identifying codes for the dominant sites where the experiments were conducted, as well as experimental block, mesh treatment, botanical names for the tree species, and mycorrhizal type. The data were entered into Excel spreadsheets and exported as comma separated value files (csv). Study area - the Heishiding Nature Reserve (111°53’E, 23°27’N, 150-927 m a.s.l.) in Guangdong Province of south China. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f1d17e61-bb6c-47a9-a648-062c63ea7f16

  • This dataset reports metrics of plant growth, including height, total biomass and the biomass of component plant parts, and percentage root colonisation by mycorrhizas, for tree seedlings of eight tropical and seven subtropical growing in pots of soil that had been amended by addition of various sources of phosphorus (inorganic phosphate, adenosine monophosphate, phytic, or a mixture of all three) plus an unfertilized control treatment with no P additions. The aim of the experiment was to test the hypothesis that seedlings of species that associate with different types of root-inhabiting mycorrhizal fungi would respond differently to the range of P sources applied in the experiment. The experiments were conducted as part of a NERC Discovery Science project with the title Explaining niche separation in tropical forests: feedbacks from root-fungal symbioses and soil phosphorus partitioning led by Professor David Burslem (University of Aberdeen) reference NE/M004848/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3ad644c9-e341-4a15-ab35-311076defc33

  • Data comprise estimates of activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (40K, 238U and 232Th series radionuclides) in environmental media (soil and stream sediments and waters) and non-human biota (focusing on the ICRP Reference Animals and Plants). For soil, stream sediments and stream waters data were derived from total K, U and Th concentrations mainly from the ongoing geochemical survey of the United Kingdom (G-BASE), conducted by the British Geological Survey. The geochemical survey data are currently incomplete for England and Wales, but almost complete coverage was obtained for K in stream sediments by using the Wolfson Atlas data for southern England. For U and Th in sediments and K, U and Th in soils, more complete coverage was achieved by geological extrapolation (using relationships between soils/sediments and bedrock/superficial geology). For media and sediments, datasets are provided for both: (i) geometric mean concentrations from measured samples on a 5 x 5 km square basis where data are available; and (ii) extrapolated surfaces covering all of England and Wales. Data for non-human biota are from targeted sampling and analyses and data review. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/bb2d7874-7bf4-44de-aa43-348bd684a2fe

  • Data comprise plot details and radionuclide activity concentrations for Sr-90, Cs-137, Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239 and Pu-240 in ‘grassy’ vegetation and soil. These radionuclide activity concentrations have been used to make estimations of total weighted absorbed doses to grassy vegetation, deciduous trees and bacteria; no dose rate estimates for grassy vegetation have been made for those sites where grassy vegetation was absent. Radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident killed coniferous trees in a 4-6 km2 area of forest to the west of the power plant. This area is now known as the 'Red Forest’ and it has subsequently regenerated with understorey vegetation and deciduous trees; it is the most anthropogenically contaminated radioactive ecosystem on Earth. In July 2016 a severe fire burnt (to varying degrees) c. 80 percent of the Red Forest; this presented a unique opportunity to study the impact of radiation on the recovery of forest ecosystems exposed to a secondary stressor (fire). To investigate this, in September 2017 the RED FIRE project set up sixty study plots in the Red Forest (in burnt and unburnt areas) with a further nine plots established close to Buriakivka village (approximately 8 km from the Red Forest). Vegetation samples from each plot were harvested using shears in September 2017. Each sample was sorted into ‘grassy’ and ‘other’ vegetation; these were air-dried (20-25 degrees Celsius) and the grassy vegetation samples homogenised prior to radionuclide analyses. Soil core samples collected in September 2017 were bulked, homogenised and sub-samples taken for determination of pH and percentage moisture determined by oven drying (approximately 60 degrees Celsius) to a constant mass. The remaining soil sample was used for the determination of radionuclide activity concentrations; prior to analyses, these samples were dried at approximately 80 degrees Celsius. This work was funded by the NERC, Grant Ref: NE/P015212/1 (RED FIRE: Radioactive Environment Damaged by fire: a Forest In Recovery) Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/60782622-7bfa-4615-a9e3-0a802a9f4674

  • Data comprise site location, soil chemistry (pH, soil moisture), soil radionuclide activity concentrations (the isotopes measured were: Americium-241, Caesium-137, Plutonium-238, -239 and -240, Strontium-90 (K-40 and U-238 activity concentrations were estimated from stable element data) and soil biological activity (derived from application of bait lamina sticks) at 18 sites in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ), Ukraine in 2016; data for four sites in 2005 are also presented. Estimate absorbed radionuclide dose rates to soil invertebrates and bacteria are also presented. The primary purpose of these data was to enable an evaluation of the potential impact of radiation on soil organisms. The work was carried out by UKCEH, Chernobyl Centre for Nuclear Safety and the University of Salford. Funding for this work was via the TREE project funded by NERC, Environment Agency and Radioactive Waste Management Ltd. under the RATE programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/19babe1c-b3a3-488c-b4fe-ebb4ab9237d8

  • Data comprise biological and ecological half-life values for marine, freshwater, terrestrial and riparian organisms. The database includes 1908 biological half-life values for 52 elements across a range of wildlife groups (marine, freshwater, terrestrial and riparian). The compilation of values from a range of sources was conducted by an international working group under the auspices of an International Atomic Energy Agency programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b95c2ea7-47d2-4816-b942-68779c59bc4d