Resolution

1 urn:ogc:def:uom:EPSG::9001

65 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 65
  • This dataset contains calculated breeding success rates for six seabird species from representative colonies on the Isle of May, off the East coast of Scotland. Annual breeding success has been measured as the number of chicks fledged per active nest for the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica, since 1982), common guillemot (Uria aalge, since 1982), razorbill (Alca torda, since 1982), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis, since 1987), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla, since 1987) and northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis, since 1987). The number of active nests recorded are also provided. Data were collected as part of the Isle of May long-term study (IMLOTS), which aims to identify the impact of environmental change on seabirds and their associated ecosystems. This monitoring has been ongoing since 1974, by essentially the same team of scientists, using the same well-documented methods throughout this time. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/02c98a4f-8e20-4c48-8167-1cd5044c4afe

  • These data are benthic organic matter stocks of coarse and fine particulate organic matter in eight Welsh upland rivers with contrasting land-use, moorland and exotic conifer, in response to riparian deciduous leaf addition. Eight sampling reaches were chosen at two sites, Llyn Brianne (4 reaches) and Plynlimon (4 reaches). The experiment consisted of adding deciduous leaves to half of the reaches whilst the other half were maintained as a control (no addition of deciduous leaves). To characterise the benthic organic matter of the studied streams, a Surber net was used to collect monthly samples during 2013 on January (before deciduous leaf addition) and from February to April (after deciduous leaf addition) in each sampling reach. The main goal of this survey was to examine how aquatic biodiversity and organic matter stocks respond to leaf addition in moorland and conifer forested rivers. Dr Isabelle Durance was responsible of organising the surveys, Marian Pye was in charge of collecting, processing and sorting the samples. The work was carried out under Diversity in Upland Rivers for Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project (Grant reference NERC NE/J014818/1). DURESS was a project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/32eaf811-be10-40cb-9794-7c5a1b97a915

  • These data consist of relative telomere length (RTL) measures from quantitative polymerase chain reaction, of Seychelles warbler birds on Cousin Island, Seychelles. The data were collected by the Seychelles Warbler Project in 1995-2014. Data include bird identity, sex, age, birth period, qPCR plate identity, RTL, technician, territory, field period, mum ID, dad ID, mum age at conception, dad age at conception, dominant female ID in the natal territory, dominant male ID in the natal territory Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8a8240a2-e8ed-495d-ae93-c35200956764

  • These data are macroinvertebrate composition and size in eight Welsh upland rivers with contrasting land-use, moorland and exotic conifer, in response to riparian deciduous leaf addition. Eight sampling reaches were chosen at two sites, Llyn Brianne (4 reaches) and Plynlimon (4 reaches). The experiment consisted of adding deciduous leaves to half of the reaches whilst the other half were maintained as a control (no addition of deciduous leaves). To characterise the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of the studied streams, Surber net sampling was used to collect monthly samples during 2013 in January (before deciduous leaf addition) and from February to April (after deciduous leaf addition) in each sampling reach. Some of the collected individuals were used to characterise the invertebrate biomass of each reach. The main goal of this survey was to examine how aquatic biodiversity responds to leaf addition in moorland and conifer forested rivers. Dr Isabelle Durance was responsible for organising the surveys, Dr Hugh Feeley and Marian Pye, were in charge of collecting, processing and sorting the invertebrate samples. The work was carried out under Diversity in Upland Rivers for Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project (Grant reference NERC NE/J014818/1). DURESS was a project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d07fe8a7-d4da-43e5-834d-e1b0f4cff0ac

  • The dataset comprises of physical property and biogeochemical measurements of saltmarsh soil collected using the hammer coring technique from the Kyle of Tongue saltmarsh in the North of Scotland. The site was chosen to represent northern, loch head marshes and to test different coring techniques in organic rich soils. The data provides a quantitative measure of the dry bulk density, water content, porosity and organic carbon content present within the soils of the Kyle of Tongue saltmarsh. A total of 4 cores were collected, 39 samples were collected at 10cm intervals down the length of each core. The samples were processed for bulk density, water content, porosity and organic carbon content which was quantified through elemental analysis. The data were collected to help create a detailed picture of saltmarsh carbon storage in the soils of UK saltmarsh and test different coring approaches. The cores were collected by the data authors in November 2018. The work was carried out under the NERC programme - Carbon Storage in Intertidal Environment (C-SIDE), NERC grant reference NE/R010846/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b57ef444-54d4-47f9-8cbf-3cfef1182b55

  • These data are cellulolytic decomposition in eight Welsh upland rivers with contrasting land-use, moorland and exotic conifer, in response to riparian deciduous leaf addition. Eight sampling reaches were chosen at two sites, Llyn Brianne (4 reaches) and Plynlimon (4 reaches). The experiment consisted of adding deciduous leaves to half of the reaches whilst the other half were maintained as a control (no addition of deciduous leaves). To characterise the cellulolytic decomposition of the studied streams, cotton strips were placed and then collected during January 2013 (before deciduous leaf addition) and March 2013 (after deciduous leaf addition) in each sampling reach. The main goal of this survey was to examine how aquatic biodiversity and litter decomposition respond to leaf addition in moorland and conifer forested rivers. Dr Isabelle Durance was responsible for organising the surveys, Dr Dan Perkins was in charge of collecting, processing and sorting the samples. The work was carried out under Diversity in Upland Rivers for Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project (Grant reference NERC NE/J014818/1). DURESS was a project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/53b4ec90-cb8a-49c6-a6f9-18a77f980b0f

  • Data comprise meterological measurements (mean, minimum and maximum daily air temperature, minimum and maximum daily relative humidity, wind speed (kilometres per second at 10metres height), dew point temperature, estimated actual vapour pressure, precipitation, estimated surface resistance, estimated albedo and estimated Potential evapotranspiration (PET)) for the Siksik catchment, North West Territories, Canada for 2013 and 2014. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5bb560ee-15bf-4ab9-8c2e-3a76c688e69d

  • [This dataset is embargoed until February 22, 2022]. Half-hourly data from eight eddy covariance towers deployed in the Sevilleta Refuge (New Mexico, USA). The main sensors deployed were sonic anemometer, relative humidity sensor and carbon dioxide concentration sensor . They were deployed and maintained by Fabio Boschetti and Andrew Cunliffe (University of Exeter). The data were collected to test the new design of eddy covariance towers and investigate the spatial variability of fluxes. Data were collected from 2018-11-01 to 2019-11-01. The data contains very few small gaps due to maintenance. Half-hourly data were gap-filled using code published on GitHub. The research was funded through NERC grant reference NE/R00062X/1 - "Do dryland ecosystems control variability and recent trends in the land CO2 sink?" Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e96466c3-5b67-41b0-9252-8f8f393807d7

  • This set of conservation biological control experiments data was collected as part of five field experiments investigating agricultural biological control techniques, particularly the effect of wild field margins on pests and predators. The study is part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. Despite the widespread concerns regarding the use of pesticides in food production and the availability of potentially viable biological pest control strategies in Integrated Pest Management (IPM) systems, the UK cereal crop production remains a bastion of pesticide use. This project aimed to understand further the reasons for this lack of adoption, using the control of summer cereal aphids as a case study. Reasons for this lack of adoption of biocontrol remain a complex interplay of both technical and economic problems. Economists highlight the potential path dependency of an industry to continue to employ a suboptimal technology, caused by past dynamics of adoption resulting in differential private cost structures of each technique. Further, risk aversion on the part of farmers regarding the perceived efficacy of a new technology may also limit up-take. This may be particularly important when IPM rests on portfolios of technologies and when little scientific understanding exists on the effect of portfolio and scale of adoption on overall efficacy. Faced with this, farmers will not adopt a socially superior IPM technology and there exists a clear need for public policy action. This action may take the form of minimising uncertainty through carefully designed research programs, government funding and dissemination of the results of large-scale research studies or direct public support for farm landscape and farm system changes that can promote biocontrol. This research looked at alternatives to the use of insecticides in arable agriculture and the difficulties facing producers in switching over to them. Two approaches were explored: habitat manipulations, to encourage predators and parasites, and using naturally occurring odours to manipulate predator distribution as model technologies. Scale and portfolio effects on biocontrol efficacy have been investigated in controlled and field scale experiments. Aim is to improve the way research and development of new products and techniques are carried out to help break the dependence on chemical pesticides. 'Semiochemical experiment data, 2005-2009 - RELU Re-bugging the system: promoting adoption of alternative pest management strategies in field crop systems' from this same research project are also available. In addition, socio-economic research has been used to help direct natural science research into the development and evaluation of a combination of habitat management and semiochemical push-pull strategies of appropriate scale and complementarity to yield viable, commercially attractive and sustainable alternatives to the use of insecticides in cereal crop agriculture. These socio-economic data are available through the UK Data Archive under study number 6960 (see online resources). Further information and documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • The data presented are growth and physiological measurements from an ozone exposure experiment, during which grassland forbs, Leontodon hispidus and Succisa pratensis were exposed to low, medium and high ozone treatments over three growing seasons, using an outdoor Free Air Ozone Enrichment system, and with and without the addition of nitrogen during the first year. The plants were planted in April 2016 and were exposed to Low, Medium and High ozone treatments over three growing seasons (May to September 2016-2018). Measurements were taken of light-saturated photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll index, number of flowering stems, leaf ground cover, and the dried weight of litter. All measurements were made by members of the project. The experiments were carried out in the UKCEH Bangor Air Pollution Facility. Work was funded by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology under the Natural Environment Research Council (UK) grant/award NEC05574. For L. hispidus a lower leaf cover was observed with elevated ozone, and there was an increase in litter with added nitrogen. For S. pratensis, elevated ozone reduced flowering and increased foliar damage. Increased litter and accelerated winter die-back with both ozone and nitrogen were also recorded for S. pratensis. These effects have implications for inter- and intra-specific competition, seed establishment, nutrient cycling, as well as the provision of general pollinator resources and highlight the need for concerted action to reduce pre-cursor ozone emissions to go alongside habitat management efforts to protect biodiversity. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/382baaf2-7795-4aa8-a434-56c9e6bd1516