Resolution

1000 urn:ogc:def:uom:EPSG::9001

201 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 201
  • This dataset consists of the 1km raster, percentage target class version of the Land Cover Map 1990 (LCM1990) for Northern Ireland. The 1km percentage product provides the percentage cover for each of 21 land cover classes for 1km x 1km pixels. This product contains one band per target habitat class (producing a 21 band image). The 21 target classes are based on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompass the entire range of UK habitats. This dataset is derived from the vector version of the Land Cover Map, which contains individual parcels of land cover and is the highest available spatial resolution. LCM1990 is a land cover map of the UK which was produced at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology by classifying satellite images (mainly from 1989 and 1990) into 21 Broad Habitat-based classes. It is the first in a series of land cover maps for the UK, which also includes maps for 2000, 2007, 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019. LCM1990 consists of a range of raster and vector products and users should familiarise themselves with the full range (see related records, the UKCEH web site and the LCM1990 Dataset documentation) to select the product most suited to their needs. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4a5e720f-5f1d-4e96-8e34-ae32c668c613

  • This dataset consists of the 1km raster, dominant target class version of the Land Cover Map 1990 (LCM1990) for Northern Ireland. The 1km dominant coverage product is based on the 1km percentage product and reports the habitat class with the highest percentage cover for each 1km pixel. The 21 target classes are based on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompass the entire range of UK habitats. This dataset is derived from the vector version of the Land Cover Map, which contains individual parcels of land cover and is the highest available spatial resolution. LCM1990 is a land cover map of the UK which was produced at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology by classifying satellite images (mainly from 1989 and 1990) into 21 Broad Habitat-based classes. It is the first in a series of land cover maps for the UK, which also includes maps for 2000, 2007, 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019. LCM1990 consists of a range of raster and vector products and users should familiarise themselves with the full range (see related records, the UKCEH web site and the LCM1990 Dataset documentation) to select the product most suited to their needs. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d33593d7-5c4d-419e-924c-b341847fd6ae

  • This dataset consists of the 1km raster, dominant aggregate class version of the Land Cover Map 1990 (LCM1990) for Great Britain. The 1km dominant coverage product is based on the 1km percentage product and reports the aggregated habitat class with the highest percentage cover for each 1km pixel. The 10 aggregate classes are groupings of 21 target classes, which are based on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompass the entire range of UK habitats. The aggregate classes group some of the more specialised classes into more general categories. For example, the five coastal classes in the target class are grouped into a single aggregate coastal class. This dataset is derived from the vector version of the Land Cover Map, which contains individual parcels of land cover and is the highest available spatial resolution. LCM1990 is a land cover map of the UK which was produced at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology by classifying satellite images (mainly from 1989 and 1990) into 21 Broad Habitat-based classes. It is the first in a series of land cover maps for the UK, which also includes maps for 2000, 2007, 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019. LCM1990 consists of a range of raster and vector products and users should familiarise themselves with the full range (see related records, the UK CEH web site and the LCM1990 Dataset documentation) to select the product most suited to their needs. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/84c07c67-88a4-439a-a339-b0577afd3886

  • The dataset records the annual number of occupied Marsh Tit breeding territories in 74 individual woods and woodland patches in 14 English counties for variable periods between 2002 and 2020. Different woods were surveyed from between one spring period and for up to 17 annual springs. Territory counts were derived from a standard highly-repeatable survey methodology or from more intensive population studies that produced high quality results. Marsh Tits are a small (10 g) songbird that are specialists of mature deciduous and mixed woodlands and have undergone a substantial population decline in Britain over recent decades. Because of their large territories, Marsh Tits are difficult to monitor by passive surveys, and so these specific and more accurate methodologies were used. This data can be used to compare with other woods using the same or a comparable methodology, investigate population trends or population-habitat relationships, or to monitor population change in future repeat surveys of the same woods. The data is georeferenced and each of the 237 individual records provides the Great Britain Ordnance Survey (OSGB) National Grid x and y coordinates of the surveyed wood, and also the woodland area surveyed, name and location (county name) of the wood, year of survey, woodland type and survey method. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8d1b93d7-b8cf-4df1-9a5d-352dc16c5195

  • This dataset consists of the 1km raster, percentage aggregate class version of the Land Cover Map 2015 (LCM2015) for Northern Ireland. The 1km percentage product provides the percentage cover for each of 10 aggregated land cover classes for 1km x 1km pixels. This product contains one band per aggregated habitat class (producing a 10 band image). The 10 aggregate classes are groupings of 21 target classes, which are based on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompass the entire range of UK habitats. The aggregate classes group some of the more specialised classes into more general categories. For example, the five coastal classes in the target class are grouped into a single aggregate coastal class. This dataset is derived from the vector version of the Land Cover Map, which contains individual parcels of land cover and is the highest available spatial resolution. LCM2015 is a land cover map of the UK which was produced at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology by classifying satellite images from 2014 and 2015 into 21 Broad Habitat-based classes. LCM2015 consists of a range of raster and vector products and users should familiarise themselves with the full range (see related records, the CEH web site and the LCM2015 Dataset documentation) to select the product most suited to their needs. LCM2015 was produced at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology by classifying satellite images from 2014 and 2015 into 21 Broad Habitat-based classes. It is one of a series of land cover maps, produced by UKCEH since 1990. They include versions in 1990, 2000, 2007, 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/362feaea-0ccf-4a45-b11f-980c6b89a858

  • This dataset consists of plant species presence and abundance in different sizes of plots recorded from the first 100 1km squares across Great Britain in 2019, as part of a rolling soil and vegetation monitoring program of 500 1km squares, repeated every 5 years. The UKCEH Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and predecessors, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way, we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to vegetation data, soil data are also gathered by the current phase of the Countryside Survey. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fd6ae272-aeb5-4573-8e8a-7ccfae64f506

  • The dataset contains global soil protease activities and common methodological parameters (i.e. fluorometric and colorimetric analysis) used to measure soil protease activity between 1970-2020. The dataset also includes key environmental parameters that affect protease activity i.e. soil type, soil pH, mean annual temperature, mean annual precipitation, soil organic carbon, and clay content. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3055e8c7-fa76-4350-bbdc-9b9958f58d10

  • [This dataset is embargoed until January 1, 2024]. This dataset comprises multiple baseline and future ensembles of hydrological model estimates of monthly mean and annual maximum river flows (m3s-1) on a 0. 0.008333° × 0. 0.008333° grid (approximate grid of 1 km × 1 km) across Peninsular Malaysia. Specifically, these are provided for historical (1971 to 2005) and projected future (2006 to 2099) periods, for 3 Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). This dataset is the output from the Hydrological Modelling Framework for Malaysia, or “HMF-Malaysia” model. The projected future hydrology simulations are provided for CORDEX-SEA (Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment – South East Asia) three RCPs (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) assuming (i) current artificial influences (CAI) such as water transfers and diversions and (ii) planned future artificial influences (FAI). This dataset is an output from the hydrological modelling study from the Malaysia - Flood Impacts Across Scales (FIAS) project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9b70bebe-189c-4ae8-9aee-1bb1db7b1ad5

  • This dataset consists of a 1km resolution raster version of the Land Cover Map 2000 for Northern Ireland. The raster consists of 27 bands. Within each band, each 1km pixel represents a percentage cover value for one of 27 target (or 'sub') classes, broadly representing Broad Habitats (see below). The dataset is part of a series of data products produced by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology known as LCM2000. LCM2000 is a parcel-based thematic classification of satellite image data covering the entire United Kingdom. LCM2000 is derived from a computer classification of satellite scenes obtained mainly from Landsat, IRS and SPOT sensors and also incorporates information derived from other ancillary datasets. LCM2000 was classified using a nomenclature corresponding to the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompasses the entire range of UK habitats. In addition, it recorded further detail where possible. The series of LCM2000 products includes vector and raster formats, with a number of different versions containing varying levels of detail and at different spatial resolutions. Note that the Band numberings in the dataset run from 1-27 rather than 0-26 and therefore each band relates to the one below it in the subclass code list (i.e. 1 = Unclassified, labelled as 0 in the list). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8eed6d77-714a-438a-aa65-887b1ef62378

  • This dataset consists of soil data for 64 field sites on paired farm sites, with 29 variables measured for soil texture and structural condition, aggregate stability, organic matter content, soil shear strength, fuel consumption, work rate, infiltration rate, water quality and hydrological condition (HOST) data. The study is part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. A move to organic farming can have significant effects on wildlife, soil and water quality, as well as changing the ways in which food is supplied, the economics of farm business and indeed the attitudes of farmers themselves. Two key questions were addressed in the SCALE project: what causes organic farms to be arranged in clusters at local, regional and national scales, rather than be spread more evenly throughout the landscape; and how do the ecological, hydrological, socio-economic and cultural impacts of organic farming vary due to neighbourhood effects at a variety of scales. The research was undertaken in 2006-2007 in two study sites: one in the English Midlands, and one in southern England. Both are sites in which organic farming has a 'strong' local presence, which we defined as 10 per cent or more organically managed land within a 10 km radius. Potential organic farms were identified through membership lists of organic farmers provided by two certification bodies (the Soil Association and the Organic Farmers and Growers). Most who were currently farming (i.e. their listing was not out of date) agreed to participate. Conventional farms were identified through telephone listings. Respondents' farms ranged in size from 40 to 3000 acres, with the majority farming between 100 and 1000 acres. Most were mixed crop-livestock farmers, with dairy most common in the southern site, and beef and/or sheep mixed with arable in the Midlands. In total, 48 farms were studied, of which 21 were organic farmers. No respondent had converted from organic to conventional production, whereas 17 had converted from conventional to organic farming. Twelve of the conventional farmers defined themselves as practicing low input agriculture. Farmer interview data from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6761 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).