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1000 urn:ogc:def:uom:EPSG::9001

166 record(s)
 
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  • This dataset contains home range size, habitat availability and selection ratio data, calculated from GPS data fixes collected from individual European nightjars, in four concurrent years (2015-2018). Home ranges are 95% areas of use, presented in hectares. Habitat availability data are presented as the percentage (%) of each habitat category (n = 6, pooled from 14 original habitat types) available to each individual within their 95% home range. Selection ratios are Manly Selection Ratios for 14 habitat types and express the extent to which each habitat type is used by each individual bird, compared to how much of it is available. Selection Ratios >1 express positive selection – i.e. used more than expected, given availability. Selection Ratios <1 express avoidance – i.e. used less than expected, given availability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d5cc1b92-6862-4475-8aa1-5936786d12ab

  • This dataset contains arthropod species presence and abundance data, species trait data and environmental data for arable reversion sites in southern England. A chronosequence of 52 arable grassland restoration sites and five target National Nature Reserve grassland communities were sampled for arthropods in 2014. These sites were located on calcareous soils. The majority of these sites were established as part of the South Downs Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA), South Wessex Downs ESA, as well as through subsequent agri-environmental schemes including Countryside Stewardship or Higher Level agri-environment. Restoration sites ranged in age (1 to 30 years), habitat quality (e.g. sward structure and floral similarity to target grasslands), management (cutting and grazing) and surrounding landscape (isolation and cover of grassland). This environmental variation was captured and is included in the data set. Arthropods were identified across a wide range of trophic groups (detrititvores, herbivores, predators and pollinators). For arthropod species identified to species, information on functional traits is derived, including body mass, dispersal ability and trophic group. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78408af3-452f-41af-95f3-ffc13b05c232

  • This dataset is a model output, from the Grid-to-Grid hydrological model driven by observed climate data (CEH-GEAR rainfall and Oudin temperature-based potential evaporation). It provides monthly mean flow (m3/s) and soil moisture (mm water/m soil) on a 1 km grid for the period 1891 to 2015. To aid interpretation, two additional spatial datasets are provided: - Digitally-derived catchment areas on a 1km x 1km grid - Estimated locations of flow gauging stations on a 1km x 1km grid and as a csv file. The data were produced as part of MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of drought and water Scarcity), which was a UK NERC-funded research project (2014-2017) that developed a risk-based approach to drought and water scarcity (http://www.mariusdroughtproject.org/). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f52f012d-9f2e-42cc-b628-9cdea4fa3ba0

  • This data resource consists of two files: (a) 1x1 km resolution Average Accumulated Exceedance (AAE) data summarising the exceedances of acidity critical loads for eight habitats; (b) 1x1 km resolution AAE data summarising the exceedances of nutrient nitrogen critical loads for thirteen habitats. The data provide information on the amount of excess acid or nitrogen deposition above the critical load values set to protect acid- and nitrogen-sensitive habitats in the UK. The AAE has been calculated using UK 5x5 km Concentration Based Estimated Deposition (CBED) data for 2014-16 (see related data). The data were generated under Defra-funded work to assess the potential areas of acid and nitrogen sensitive habitats at risk of adverse impacts from excess atmospheric acid and nitrogen deposition. Reducing the area and amount of critical load exceedance continues to be a driver of Government policy on reducing emissions of acidic and nitrogen-containing air pollutants (sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and ammonia). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/92a4c2cd-fc16-414a-95c8-45b83769b503

  • The data resource contains daily time-series of simulated streamflow, ground water levels and estimated demands, from humans, livestock and irrigation across the Narmada Basin, India. The data were generated using the Global Water Availability Assessment (GWAVA) Model 5. For the Upper Narmada, a baseline of 1970-2013 is presented along with a future time slice of 2028- 2060. For the whole Narmada, a baseline of 1981-2013 and future period of 2021-2099 is included. The data were produced to help predict how climate and land use change in the region would impact on future water security. The research was funded by NERC research grant NE/R000131/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9fc7ab01-c622-46f1-a904-0bcd54073da3

  • This product consists of maps of predicted average annual application rates of three different inorganic chemical fertilisers – nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) - in England across a six-year period (2010-2015). The estimates, along with their respective estimates of uncertainty, are provided at a 1 km x 1 km resolution. These data were modelled from Defra British Survey of Fertiliser Practice (BSFP) data using a spatial interpolation procedure. Different uses and potential applications of the produced maps, including the following: 1) Modelling nutrient fate to predict impacts of changes in farming practices (intensification/extensification) on nutrient runoff to water; 2) Estimating greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions due to fertiliser application to crops and grassland (linked with air quality impacts); 3) Quantifying past and future impacts of eutrophication and/or agricultural management on agricultural ecosystems and indicators such as arable plants, farmland birds, pollinators; 4) Linking crop growth models to predict areas where better nutrient management may improve yields; 5) Improving policies aimed at mitigating negative impacts of fertiliser use (e.g. catchment sensitive farming to reduce pollution and/or improve water quality). This data product was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) under research programme NE/N018125/1 Achieving Sustainable Agricultural Systems (ASSIST). ASSIST is an initiative jointly supported by NERC and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/15f415db-e87b-4ab5-a2fb-37a78e7bf051

  • The dataset records the annual number of occupied Marsh Tit breeding territories in 74 individual woods and woodland patches in 14 English counties for variable periods between 2002 and 2020. Different woods were surveyed from between one spring period and for up to 17 annual springs. Territory counts were derived from a standard highly-repeatable survey methodology or from more intensive population studies that produced high quality results. Marsh Tits are a small (10 g) songbird that are specialists of mature deciduous and mixed woodlands and have undergone a substantial population decline in Britain over recent decades. Because of their large territories, Marsh Tits are difficult to monitor by passive surveys, and so these specific and more accurate methodologies were used. This data can be used to compare with other woods using the same or a comparable methodology, investigate population trends or population-habitat relationships, or to monitor population change in future repeat surveys of the same woods. The data is georeferenced and each of the 237 individual records provides the Great Britain Ordnance Survey (OSGB) National Grid x and y coordinates of the surveyed wood, and also the woodland area surveyed, name and location (county name) of the wood, year of survey, woodland type and survey method. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8d1b93d7-b8cf-4df1-9a5d-352dc16c5195

  • This dataset consists of the 1km raster, percentage target class version of the Land Cover Map 1990 (LCM1990) for Great Britain. The 1km percentage product provides the percentage cover for each of 21 land cover classes for 1km x 1km pixels. This product contains one band per target habitat class (producing a 21 band image). The 21 target classes are based on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompass the entire range of UK habitats. This dataset is derived from the vector version of the Land Cover Map, which contains individual parcels of land cover and is the highest available spatial resolution. LCM1990 is a land cover map of the UK which was produced at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology by classifying satellite images (mainly from 1989 and 1990) into 21 Broad Habitat-based classes. It is the first in a series of land cover maps for the UK, which also includes maps for 2000, 2007, 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019. LCM1990 consists of a range of raster and vector products and users should familiarise themselves with the full range (see related records, the UKCEH web site and the LCM1990 Dataset documentation) to select the product most suited to their needs. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/bb381b5b-d44e-4dbd-a9d1-efffd4c3e4a8

  • This dataset consists of the 1km raster, dominant aggregate class version of the Land Cover Map 2015 (LCM2015) for Northern Ireland. The 1km dominant coverage product is based on the 1km percentage product and reports the aggregated habitat class with the highest percentage cover for each 1km pixel. The 10 aggregate classes are groupings of 21 target classes, which are based on the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompass the entire range of UK habitats. The aggregate classes group some of the more specialised classes into more general categories. For example, the five coastal classes in the target class are grouped into a single aggregate coastal class. This dataset is derived from the vector version of the Land Cover Map, which contains individual parcels of land cover and is the highest available spatial resolution. LCM2015 consists of a range of raster and vector products and users should familiarise themselves with the full range (see related records, the CEH web site and the LCM2015 Dataset documentation) to select the product most suited to their needs. LCM2015 was produced at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology by classifying satellite images from 2014 and 2015 into 21 Broad Habitat-based classes. It is one of a series of land cover maps, produced by UKCEH since 1990. They include versions in 1990, 2000, 2007, 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c38b3986-b67e-40e9-9026-85ddbe3830d3

  • This dataset contains prey items of common guillemot Uria aalge and razorbill Alca torda observed during the 2018 breeding season at East Caithness Special Protection Area (SPA), Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA and Isle of May National Nature Reserve, off the east coast of Scotland. Diet of these two species has been studied on the Isle of May since the 1980s (Harris & Wanless 1985, 1986; Wilson et al 2004; Daunt et al. 2008; Thaxter et al 2013). To our knowledge, only two previous studies of diet has been undertaken at Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA (in 2006, 6km to the north of the site used in this study; Anderson et al. 2014; and in 2017, using a similar protocol as in 2018; Daunt et al. 2017), and one previous study of diet has been undertaken at East Caithness SPA (2017; Daunt et al. 2017). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d7164910-17cb-44cd-bccd-6a9c31b6ed70