Topic
 

biota

1352 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 1352
  • This dataset contains whole genome sequence data for Wallacean endemic ungulates (anoa and babirusa) spanning from the 1800 to the present day. This time frame covers the period of accelerated forest loss across the Wallacean islands, to track changes in genetic health of these two flagship taxa. Deforestation is expected to disproportionately impact forest specialists such as the anoa and babirusa, making it crucial we understand how genetic health is impacted in declining populations. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the European Nucleotide Archive.

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Spittle Bug data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. These data are collected by quadrat sampling at all of ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol . They represent continuous annual records from 1993 to 2012. Spittle Bug adults (Philaenus spumarius) are sampled and separated by sex and by colour morph; it is likely that the proportions of morphs are environmentally determined and will therefore be good indicators of environmental change. Spittle bug nymphs are counted and the mean number of nymphs per spittle recorded. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site monitoring and/or network co-ordination activities. These organisations are: Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru - Natural Resources Wales, Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Environment Agency, Forestry Commission, Llywodraeth Cymru - Welsh Government, Natural England, Natural Environment Research Council, Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Government and Scottish Natural Heritage. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e1c292b0-12c7-4998-b48f-7a83a203e604

  • This dataset is part of the study of mimetic host shifts in an endangered social parasite of ants, which is a joint study of the NERC's Centre for Ecology & Hydrology(UK), the University of Oxford(UK), University of Bialystok(Poland), Polish Academy of Sciences(Poland) and UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research(Germany). Combined with datasets collected from previous study, they compare the proportions of caterpillars of Maculinea rebeli being adopted by resident Myrmica ant species near Przemysl, Poland in autumn with proportions of successful survivors the following summer to establish host specificity of the socially parasitic butterfly species. The data comprise: the study year, the ant species, total number of ant nest, the number of caterpillar survivors found in the nest of each ant species, number of nests with caterpillar presence and total number of nests without caterpillar presence. They were obtained from one population for 4 years(Y2001, Y2003, Y2004, Y2005). Detailed research method can be found in Thomas et al. (2013) Mimetic host shifts in an endangered social parasite of ants. Proc. R. Soc. B vol. 280 no.1751. (doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.2336) Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b472d635-d8fa-4c39-acfe-2b285ca0b9a8

  • This dataset contains DNA sequence data from reproductive Bombus terrestris audax workers brain and ovarian tissue (80 – 100 days post establishment), and from the tissue of male offspring of these workers at varying developmental stages, specifically stage 4 larval heads, pupal heads, adult (13 – 14 days old) male brains and adult male sperm. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the NCBI SRA under BioProject PRJNA573598

  • [This dataset is embargoed until April 1, 2023]. This dataset contains information about the recordings of great tits, blue tits, marsh tits and nuthatches discovering novel food patches in relation to manipulated local population densities (see 1a4dcbb3-c4fb-4bd4-acb3-d03932de9323). Prior to and during the density manipulation experiment, novel feeders were placed at random locations and the discovery of these was recorded using a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag attached to each bird and the information recorded using a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) antenna within the feeder. The experiment took place in Wytham Woods, Oxfordshire, UK between January and March 2021, as part of a study on the effects of ecological factors on social structure and information transmission. Data collection was performed by Keith McMahon, Sam Croft and Kristina Beck. The work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council (Grant NE/S010335/1), The ecology of behavioural contagion in natural systems. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e250ae89-2e1f-4664-9092-5a8593d50fdf

  • Dataset contains DNA sequencing from reciprocal crosses of B.terrestris dalmatinus and B.terrestris audax which were carried out by Biobest, Leuven. Four successful colonies (one of each cross direction) from two ’families’ were housed at the University of Leuven and kept in 21◦C with red light conditions, they were fed ad libitum with pollen and a sugar syrup. Callow workers were tagged in order to determine age. Worker reproductive status was confirmed by ovary dissection and entire bodies were then stored at -80◦C along with the original queen mothers and male fathers. Three reproductive workers, aged 16-17days, were selected from queen-less conditions from each of the crosses. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the NCBI SRA under BioProject PRJNA573820

  • This dataseries investigates the thermal transcriptome of phytoplankton in response to acute and chronic temperature stress. It is comprised of three subseries: 1. Thermal transcriptome of Phaeodactylum tricornutum in response to gradual heat stress. 2. Thermal transcriptome of Phaeodactylum tricornutum in steady-state growth, and 3. Thermal transcriptome of Synechocystis in response to gradual heat stress. To investigate the molecular underpinnings of gradual heat stress, we expose cultures to high temperature and follow changes in gene expression through time (over a 12 hour period) in comparison to optimal conditions. To understand how the thermal transcriptome response to chronic thermal stress, we acclimated P. tricornutum in steady state growth under optimal conditions and compare the gene expression to that under sub-optimal and supra-optimal conditions. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) National Center Biotechnology Information (NCBI).

  • This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA). The dataset contains unprocessed single cell sequence from hemocytes in Drosophila melanogaster populations highly resistant or highly susceptible to the parasitic wasp Leptopilina boulardi. Wild caught D. melanogaster females were collected from Cambridge, UK, to establish an outbreed population. From this, three replicated populations were selected for resistance to L. boulardi strain NSRef for 26 generations (Selection). Another three populations were maintained in the laboratory for 26 generations without being exposed to parasitoid-associated selection pressures (No Selection). At generation 26, second instar D. melanogaster larvae (48-63 hours after fertilization) from each population were infected with L. boulardi for three hours (Infection) or maintained without infection (No infection). 48 hours after, circulating hemocytes from third instar D. melanogaster larvae (96-111 hours after fertilization) from each population were collected in PBS and cleaned in OptiPrep solution (1.09g/ml). 10X Single Cell GEX v2 libraries were prepared and sequenced. CellRanger v2 was used to generate sample cell count matrices. Seurat v3 was used to integrate, normalise and cluster the cell types.

  • Baseline Vegetation data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. These data are collected at all of ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol (see supporting documentation). This was a one-off whole site baseline vegetation survey (though given the intensive nature of this survey, some sites did it over successive years) to generate a vegetation map and identify the areas within the site to be monitored. In this protocol up to 500 systemic 2m x 2m plots were surveyed and species presence recorded. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site monitoring and/or network co-ordination activities. These organisations are: Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru - Natural Resources Wales, Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Environment Agency, Forestry Commission, Llywodraeth Cymru - Welsh Government, Natural England, Natural Environment Research Council, Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Government and Scottish Natural Heritage. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a7b49ac1-24f5-406e-ac8f-3d05fb583e3b

  • This dataset consists of silicon isotope data from deep-sea sediment cores taken off southeast Iceland. Samples of sea sponges were collected using piston cores and sediment cores aboard the RV Celtic Explorer in 2008 and dried or frozen for transportation. Organic matter was removed and samples were preserved for later analysis. Sample analysis occurred in 2012 as part of a comprehensive study of the carbon cycle. The data collected form the field component of the NERC-funded project "Unravelling the carbon cycle using silicon isotopes in the oceans". The project aimed to investigate deep sea sponges and the silicon they produce, in an effort to piece together the links between the supply of vital nutrients in different parts of the ocean and the crucial role other marine organisms play in absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere and storing it in deep sea sediments as organic carbon. The Discovery Science project was composed of New Investigators (FEC) Grant reference NE/J00474X/1 led by Dr. Katherine Rosemary Hendry of Cardiff University, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences. The project ran from 26 January 2012 to 30 September 2013. The silicon isotope data have been received by BODC as raw files, and will be processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and made available online in the near future. The raw files are available on request.