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biota

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  • This dataset provides data on the timing of butterfly flight periods for each UK butterfly species across all monitored sites in the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Annual data from over 2,500 sites are presented relating to the timing (first appearance, last appearance, date of peak abundance and mean flight date) and the duration (total number of days, standard deviation around the mean flight date) of the flight period for all UK butterfly species from 1976 to the present year. In addition, this data is divided each year for eleven multi-voltine species to provide separate phenology data for distinct flight periods associated with first and subsequent generations. Phenology change is a widely used measure of the biological impacts of climate change because of the close relationship between temperature and the timing of biological events. This dataset provides an invaluable tool for assessing the impacts of climate change both spatially and temporally. The UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme is organized and funded by Butterfly Conservation (BC), the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). The UKBMS is indebted to all volunteers who contribute data to the scheme. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4bc7bb9f-4a7a-46ff-aa63-2747e248fd1e

  • This dataset contains arthropod species presence and abundance data, species trait data and environmental data for arable reversion sites in southern England. A chronosequence of 52 arable grassland restoration sites and five target National Nature Reserve grassland communities were sampled for arthropods in 2014. These sites were located on calcareous soils. The majority of these sites were established as part of the South Downs Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA), South Wessex Downs ESA, as well as through subsequent agri-environmental schemes including Countryside Stewardship or Higher Level agri-environment. Restoration sites ranged in age (1 to 30 years), habitat quality (e.g. sward structure and floral similarity to target grasslands), management (cutting and grazing) and surrounding landscape (isolation and cover of grassland). This environmental variation was captured and is included in the data set. Arthropods were identified across a wide range of trophic groups (detrititvores, herbivores, predators and pollinators). For arthropod species identified to species, information on functional traits is derived, including body mass, dispersal ability and trophic group. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78408af3-452f-41af-95f3-ffc13b05c232

  • This data set includes longitudinal occurrence of bird species at 36 forest plots – half of which burned during the 2015-16 El Niño drought – distributed across a gradient of prior human disturbance in the Brazilian Amazon. Data was collected in 2010 and 2016 (around 6 years before, and one year after the 2015-16 El Niño, respectively) as part of the projects ‘Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems’ (AFIRE) and ‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests’ (ECOFOR), within the NERC Human-Modified Tropical Forest (HTMF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b05caee-a3c8-46a7-b675-e5a94554bd9f

  • This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) under accession number PRJEB36506. Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) colour traits have fascinated biologists for a hundred years, and present a unique system for investigating the evolution of colour polymorphism. The aim of this project is to identify regions of the guppy genome responsible for colour patterning in males of the species (the sex which shows colour patterning). Using pool-sequencing, we genotyped four inbred guppy lines (n=48 per line), which originate from a natural guppy population, Paria. Each line was founded by one male showing distinct colouration patterns, and has been backcrossed with unrelated females every generation for ~40 generations, allowing Y-linked colour to be inherited intact from father to son (iso-Y lines).

  • The datasets contain insect numbers, plant biomass, successful attacks of parasitoids, and behavioural response of parasitoids. The data are based on direct observations of insects and plants in field and laboratory experiments testing for the impact of different spectra of artificial light at night on an experimental insect food web with coloured near-monochromatic LEDs, with a single peak emittance across the visible and near-UV spectrum at wavelengths of 385, 447, 469, 475, 518, 607 and 630 nm plus a dark control. The dark control was exposed to the natural background light levels at night. We kept photon flux similar to the output of a white light LED at 20 lux, for all light treatments apart from the UV treatment. Data collection was done in a field site, and controlled temperature room at Penryn Campus of University of Exeter, Penryn, UK. The field experiment was set up on 3rd June 2017 and ran for 17 weeks, while the additional experiments were conducted between summer 2017 and summer 2018. The data have been sampled as part of the NERC project NE/N001672/1 “Effects of artificial light on multi-trophic population dynamics”. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dfe9a1ed-fc98-4abd-8040-6ee9f01cfcd0

  • A measure of the extent and complexity of riprian vegetation upstream of chalkstream sites derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for 15 discrete chalkstreams distributed along a white chalk geology extending from Dorset in the south west, through Wiltshire, to Hampshire in the north east. For each site there is an estimate of the minimum, maximum, mean and standard deviation height of vegetation along the banks for a range of distances upstream from the sampling location. Information on the extent and complexity of riparian vegetation upstream of chalkstream sites were used to better understand the relationships between in-stream biological communities and catchment and riparian land use. Stream sites surveyed represented a sample of chalkstreams across a gradient of catchment land cover intensification from catchments dominated by extensive calcareous grassland and woodland to those dominated by arable and improved grasslands. LiDAR data were obtained from the Environment Agency in April 2014. This dataset was created as part of work package 3.1 of the Wessex Biodiversity & Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/49792936-9f11-4df6-98b3-9a9de595ee69

  • This dataset contains calculated breeding success rates for six seabird species from representative colonies on the Isle of May, off the East coast of Scotland. Annual breeding success has been measured as the number of chicks fledged per active nest for the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica, since 1982), common guillemot (Uria aalge, since 1982), razorbill (Alca torda, since 1982), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis, since 1987), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla, since 1987) and northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis, since 1987). The number of active nests recorded are also provided. Data were collected as part of the Isle of May long-term study (IMLOTS), which aims to identify the impact of environmental change on seabirds and their associated ecosystems. This monitoring has been ongoing since 1974, by essentially the same team of scientists, using the same well-documented methods throughout this time. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/02c98a4f-8e20-4c48-8167-1cd5044c4afe

  • Data were collected to determine the geographic distribution of different cytotypes of Campanula rotundifolia L. Most sampling concentrated on Britain and Ireland, but samples from mainland Europe, the Russian Federation and North America were also analysed. Following these observations, a common garden study of tetraploid, pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes representative of Britain and Ireland was set up at a CEH Edinburgh (where the local cytotype is tetraploid), to determine whether climatic factors were limiting the distribution of the hexaploid cytotype through effects on growth, survival or flowering phenology. The geographic distribution study ran from 2006-2019. The common garden study ran from 2008-2010. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/673b2b31-562c-4604-8776-4a92988867b8

  • The dataset describes the functional effects traits derived for 57 taxonomic units (species, genus and family level classifications) of oilseed rape insect pollinators. This data provides information on both morphological and behavioural traits, typically at the species level, but also at a generic and functional group level. Data acquisition was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) under research programme NE/N018125/1 Achieving Sustainable Agricultural Systems (ASSIST). ASSIST is an initiative jointly supported by NERC and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f09a0ada-b5c6-4dd9-9c7b-2fed23ab79b1

  • Geographic distances between pairs of wild bumblebee colonies across an agricultural landscape centred on the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Colony locations were estimated using the foraging locations of workers sampled in summer 2011, genotyped and grouped into full-sib families. The spatial structure of five Bombus species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum and B. ruderatus) was determined, with inter-colony distances varying from 7 to 5264 metres. Data were collected as part of a project led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8b3f4857-9809-43cb-b2aa-a988e64a5449