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elevation

990 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 990
  • The dataset details global positioning system (GPS) locations recorded for survey quadrats at six UK saltmarsh sites. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a salt marsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Each site comprised 22 quadrats on the unvegetated mudflat and 22 quadrats on the salt marsh. The locations indicated by this dataset correspond to the south-east corner of the quadrats which were 1m square and oriented with their sides aligned North-South and East-West. We combined spatial data relating to the environs of the study sites from a number of sources (Ordnance Survey Digital Terrain Models, Ordnance Survey Boundary Line, Environment Agency Saltmarsh Extents, Natural England Priority Habitat Inventory). These were rasterised and quadrat values were extracted on a pointwise basis for elevation and proximity (distance to creek, habitat edge and high water mark). Tidal height was calculated with reference to the relevant Tidal Gauge and Admiralty Standard Port information. This data was derived as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78a2cab5-dca5-411b-ac5b-c2c080928b1d

  • This is a high resolution spatial dataset of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data in South West England. The DTM along with a Digital Surface Model (DSM) cover an area of 9424 km2 that includes all the land west of Exmouth (i.e. west of circa 3 degrees 21 minutes West). The DTM represents the topographic model (height) of the bare earth. The dataset is a part of outcomes from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology South West (SW) Project. There is also a Digital Surface Model (DSM) dataset covering the same areas available from the SW project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e2a742df-3772-481a-97d6-0de5133f4812

  • This is a high resolution spatial dataset of Digital Surface Model (DSM) data in South West England. It is a part of outcomes from the CEH South West (SW) Project. There is also a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) dataset covering the same areas available from the SW project. Both DTM and DSM cover an area of 9424 km2 that includes all the land west of Exmouth (i.e. west of circa 3 degrees 21 minutes West). The DSM includes the height of features on the bare earth such as buildings or vegetation (if present). An overview of the TELLUS project is available on the web at http://www.tellusgb.ac.uk/. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b81071f2-85b3-4e31-8506-cabe899f989a

  • Elevation contour lines within the Severn catchment at 10 metre intervals. Digitised from the scanned topographic maps.

  • Elevation contour lines within the Wye catchment at 10 and 20 metre intervals. The contour lines have been digitised from a scanned topographic map.

  • Spot heights (elevation values in metres) for areas within the Plynlimon catchments; digitised from scanned topographic maps of Plynlimon Catchment Areas.

  • Hydrologically corrected digital terrain model (DTM) of Plynlimon catchments. The DTM was derived from digitised elevation data from scanned topographic maps.

  • The dataset comprises the combination of estimates of anthropogenic carbon derived from hydrographic occupations of the 26N section with volume transports for the area between east USA and Africa calculated using the RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS AMOC timeseries. The data cover the time period between April 2004 and October 2012. The observations will be used with data from other sources to determine and interpret the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic, to infer the magnitude and variability of uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and assess the risk of changes in the meridional overturning circulation on the marine carbon cycle. The Atlantic Biogeochemical Fluxes programme (ABC-Fluxes) is a joint effort between NERC in the UK (Principal Investigator Elaine McDonagh), and NOAA in the USA (Molly Baringer). It builds on the work of the RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS programme, a joint effort between NERC in the UK (Principal Investigator Eleanor Frajka-Williams), NOAA (Molly Baringer) and RSMAS (Bill Johns) in the USA. The Atlantic anthropogenic carbon transport (and its components), calculated from the above data, are held by BODC in NetCDF format.

  • A large number of charts (originals and copies) together with tabulations of data are also available, some of which date back to the 1850s. A more detailed description of these will be available once they have been systematically catalogued and archived.

  • A set of historical tide gauge sea level records from Santander (Northern Spain) have been recovered from logbooks stored at the Spanish National Geographical Institute (IGN). Sea level measurements have been digitised, quality-controlled and merged into a consistent sea level time series. Vertical references among instruments benchmarks have been derived from high precision vertical levelling surveys. The observations were recorded as daily averages and are from three different instruments in two locations in Santander (Spain). The historical sea level record in Santander consists of a daily time series spanning the period 1876-1924 and it is further connected to the modern tide gauge station nearby, ensuring datum continuity up to the present. The data from Santander comes from a floating gauge and then syphon gauges. This scarcity of long-term sea-level observations, as well as their uneven geographical distribution is a major challenge for climate studies that address, for example, the quantification of mean sea-level rise at centennial time scales, the accurate assessment of sea-level acceleration or the long-term changes in sea-level extremes that are vital for coastal risk assessments. This dataset represents an additional effort of sea-level data archaeology and aims at preserving the historical scientific heritage that has been up to now stored in old archives in non-electronic format. The research was partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities. A further two series were rescued from Alicante under the same initiative.