Topic
 

farming

99 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 99
  • The data comprises physiological and yield measurements from an ozone (O3) exposure experiment, during which three varieties of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) were exposed to Low, Medium and High O3 treatments using heated dome shaped glasshouses (solardomes). The Erato orange variety was exposed to the three treatments from June to October 2019 and the Murasaki variety from June to October 2021. The Beauregard variety was grown on two occasions, with treatments from August to October 2020, and June to October 2021. Measurements were taken of leaf stomatal conductance, leaf chlorophyll content index as well as the harvest (fresh) weight of tubers. All measurements were made by the corresponding author. The experiments were carried out in the UKCEH Bangor Air Pollution Facility. This work was carried out as part of the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Long-Term Science Official Development Assistance ‘SUNRISE’ project, NEC06476. Stomatal conductance was found to be significantly reduced in the elevated ozone treatments. Yield for the Erato orange and Murasaki varieties was reduced by ~40% and ~50% (Medium and High, respectively, vs Low) whereas Beauregard yield (2021) was reduced by 58% in both (the tubers for the Beauregard plants grown in 2020 were not fully formed). Sweet potato is a staple food crop grown in locations deemed to be at risk from O3 pollution (e.g. Sub-Saharan Africa), and this dataset adds much needed stomatal conductance and yield data of sweet potato grown under different O3 exposure conditions. This can be used to improve model predictions of O3 impacts on sweet potato, along with associated risk assessments. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/66e73c38-5b85-44a1-818a-52189bdcffda

  • Data are presented from an ozone exposure experiment performed on four African crops. The crops (Beans, Cowpeas, Amaranth and Sorghum) were exposed to three different levels of ozone and two heat treatments in the UK CEH Bangor solardomes. The experiment ran from May 2018 to September 2018. The crop plants were grown from seed, in pots in solardomes. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the impact of ozone exposure on the crop yield and plant health. The dataset comprises of manually collected data on plant physiology, biomass and yield. In addition the automatically logged data of ozone concentration and meteorological variables in the solardomes are presented. Plant physiology data is stomatal conductance of individual leaves, measured on an ad-hoc basis. The dataset includes the associated data measured by the equipment (relative humidity, leaf temperature, photosynthetically active radiation – a small number of photosynthetically active radiation measurements are missing due to faulty readings). Soil moisture of the pots was always measured at the same time, and chlorophyll content of the measured leaf was usually, but not always, determined at the same time. Yield of beans and cowpeas was determined for each plant. For Amaranth, only the seed head weight was determined. Sorghum did not reach yield, therefore, total biomass at harvest is given as an alternative. Total biomass was not determined for those plants of other crop types that did reach yield. The ozone and meteorological dataset is complete, but with some gap-filling for short periods when the computer was not logging data The work was carried out as part of the NERC funded SUNRISE project (NE/R000131/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f7da626c-f39c-474f-b2e7-8638ab26d166

  • The data pertains to a single time point ‘snapshot’ spatial sampling of site characteristics, soil parameters and soil greenhouse gas emissions for two sites (Extensive and Intensive). The extensively managed site (‘Extensive’; 240-340 m above sea level; a.s.l.) consisted of an 11.5 ha semi-improved, sheep-grazed pasture at Bangor University’s Henfaes Research Station, Abergwyngregyn, North Wales (53°13’13’’N, 4°0’34’’W). The intensively managed site (‘Intensive’; on average 160 m a.s.l.) was a 1.78 ha sheep-grazed pasture located in south-west England, at the North Wyke Farm Platform (NWFP), Rothamsted Research, Okehampton, Devon (50°46’10’’N, 30°54’05’’W). At the Extensive site soil and gas sampling was conducted on 30th November 2016. At the Intensive site soil and gas sampling was conducted on 1st August 2016. The data contains: site characteristics including elevation, slope, compound topographic index, vegetation type or manure application, and sample point grid references; soil parameters including soil bulk density, soil percentage water-filled pore space, soil moisture, soil organic matter contents, soil pH, soil nitrate nitrogen concentration, soil ammonium nitrogen concentration, soil percentage total carbon contents, soil percentage total nitrogen contents, and carbon to nitrogen content ratio; and soil greenhouse gas flux data for nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane. The study was conducted as a wider part of the NERC funded Uplands-N2O project and BBSRC-supported Rothamsted Research, North Wyke Farm Platform (Grant Nos: NE/M015351/1, NE/M013847/1, NE/M013154/1, BBS/E/C/000J0100, BBS/E/C/000I0320, BBS/E/C/000I0330). Quantifying the spatial and variability of the drivers of greenhouse gas emissions and their interactions in grazing systems is critical to improve our understanding of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane fluxes, enabling better estimates of aggregated greenhouse gas emissions and associated uncertainties at the landscape scale. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f3118fa8-6bec-488b-9713-2415912b8b9e

  • The data consist of nitrogen gene data, soil biodiversity indices and microbial community composition for three soil depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm) from a winter wheat field experiment located in the United Kingdom and collected between April 2017 and August 2017. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon and Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales. At each site measurements were taken from 15 plots, organised within a randomised complete block design where 5 plots did not receive fertilizers (controls), 5 plots received food-based digestate, and 5 plots received acidified food based digestate a nitrification inhibitor. Soil samples were taken within two weeks of digestate application and shortly before winter wheat harvest. Soil chemical parameters were: soil nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, amino acids and peptides, soil organic matter content as loss-on-ignition, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, permanganate oxdisable carbon citric acid extractable phosphorous, Olsen-P and total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Soil biological measure were: microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Soil samples were taken by members of staff from Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Bangor), Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography Sustainable Agricultural Sciences, and Rothamsted Research North Wyke. Measurements were carried out Rothamsted Research Harpenden and the Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Wallingford). Soil physico-chemical parameters were measured on the same soil samples and are presented in a related dataset. https://catalogue.ceh.ac.uk/id/90df9dfa-a0c8-4ead-a13d-0a0a13cda7ab Data was collected for the Newton Fund project “UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy”. Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/391c0294-07f1-4856-b592-428bd44055ca

  • Third-generation cephalosporin resistance (3GC-R) in Escherichia coli is a rising problem in human and farmed-animal populations. We conducted whole-genome sequencing analysis of representative 3GC-R isolates previously collected from dairy farms in southwest England, and human urinary isolates collected from the same geographical area and time-period, and confirmed by PCR to carry acquired 3GC-R genes. This analysis identified blaCTX-M (131 isolates encoding CTX-M-1, -14, -15, -and 32 and the novel variant CTX-M-214), blaCMY-2 (6 isolates), and blaDHA-1 (1 isolate). A highly conserved plasmid was identified in 73 isolates, representing 27 E. coli sequence types. This novel ∼220-kb IncHI2 plasmid carrying blaCTX-M-32 was sequenced to closure and designated pMOO-32. 'This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the European Nucleotide Archive'.

  • This data were created as part of the NIMFRU project and consists of 21 flood matrices. These have been completed by community members from the project target communities of Anyangabella, Agule and Kaikamosing which are all found in the Katakwi district. Five of the matrices were completed by local district officers. The data were collected in December 2020. These data were collected to understand how communities resilience had changed as a result of the NIMFRU project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/463b2bcc-731a-42af-ba69-1662aa21f1bf

  • [This dataset is embargoed until December 1, 2022]. This dataset is a product of the raw HEA (household economy approach) data that were collected in sixteen communities in the Katakwi district, and the raw IHM (individual household method) data that was collected with 42 households in the community of Anyangabella, and 51 households in the community of Kaikamosing. These data were collected in December 2020 and shows the crop calendars of the Katakwi district. These data consist of quantitative information relating to crop and fishing production timelines throughout a typical agricultural year. The data were collected to support the analysis of vulnerability levels of different to further support livelihood impact modelling, and the development of targeted policies to support resilience at household and community level. The data collection team comprised of local, Ugandan partners. All data were collected in the local language and translated into English. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d91bd655-ad51-42c1-a8d0-91923246244b

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Modelled average percentage yield loss due to ground-level ozone pollution (per 1 degree by 1 degree grid cell) are presented for the crops maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa), soybean (Glycine max) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) for the period 2010-2012. Data are on a global scale, based on the distribution of production for each crop, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation’s (FAO) Global Agro-Ecological Zones (GAEZ) crop production data for the year 2000. Modelled ozone data (2010-2012) needed for yield loss calculations were derived from the EMEP MSC-W (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, Meteorological Synthesising Centre-West) chemical transport model (version 4.16). Mapping the global crop yield losses due to ozone highlights the impact of ozone on crops and allows areas at high risk of ozone damage to be identified, which is one of the first steps towards mitigation of the problem. The yield loss calculations were done as part of the NERC funded SUNRISE project (NEC06476). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/181a7dd5-0fd4-482a-afce-0fa6875b5fb3

  • This dataset comprises 259 smallholder agricultural field surveys collected from twenty-six villages across three Districts in Mozambique, Africa. Surveys were conducted in ten fields in each of six villages in Mabalane District, Gaza Province, ten villages in Marrupa District, Niassa Province, and ten villages in Gurue District, Zambezia Province. Data were collected in Mabalane between May-Sep 2014, Marrupa between May-Aug 2015, and Gurue between Sep-Dec 2015. Fields were selected based on their age, location, and status as an active field at the time of the survey (i.e. no fallow fields were sampled). Structured interviews using questionnaires were conducted with each farmer to obtain information about current management practices (e.g. use of inputs, tilling, fire and residue management), age of the field, crops planted, crop yields, fallow cycles, floods, erosion and other problems such as crop pests and wild animals. The survey also includes qualitative observations about the fields at the time of the interview, including standing live trees and cropping systems. This dataset was collected as part of the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) funded ACES project , which aims to understand how changing land use impacts on ecosystem services and human wellbeing of the rural poor in Mozambique. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78c5dcee-61c1-44be-9c47-8e9e2d03cb63

  • The data consist of soil physicochemical and biological data for three soil depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm) from a three-cut silage plot trial located at three grassland sites within the UK collected between April 2016 and October 2016. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon, Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales, and Easter Bush in Scotland. At each site measurements were taken from sixteen plots, organised within a randomised complete block design: four (control) plots did not receive fertilizer, four plots received urea only, four plots received urea and urea-inhibitors, and four plots received ammonium-nitrate (Nitram). Fertiliser was applied three times and three cuts were performed. All parameters were measured following fertiliser application. Samples were taken before fertilizer additions at peak growth and before the last silage cut. Soil physical parameters were: aggregate size distribution, aggregate stability, texture (sand/silt/clay) and soil moisture. Soil chemical parameters were: soil nitrate and ammonium, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, amino acids and peptides, soil organic matter content as loss-on-ignition, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, permanganate oxdisable carbon, citric acid extractable phosphorous, Olsen-P and total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Soil biological measures were: microbial biomass, carbon and nitrogen. Microbial community composition and nitrogen genes were measured on the same soil samples and are presented in a separate dataset (https://doi.org/10.5285/59f81d41-a789-4c5c-8ab8-36baa7ac2c55) Measurements were undertaken by members of staff from the Centre of Ecology & Hydrology (Bangor, Edinburgh, Lancaster, Wallingford), Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Agricultural Sciences, North Wyke. Data was collected for the Newton Fund project "UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy". Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7a87dde4-b54e-49b0-8751-1d59e8aebb90