Topic
 

oceans

1325 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 1325
  • The dataset comprises 22 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the Irish Sea and St. George's Channel and the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area specifically both North and South of Loury Canyon, from April to June of 1971. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the National Institute of Oceanography.

  • The dataset comprises 35 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the South West Atlantic Ocean (limit 20W) area specifically Drake Passage during December 2004. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Southampton Oceanography Centre.

  • Data from this project is a UK contribution to a US research cruise that aimed to examine the impact of wave breaking and bubble processes on air-sea gas exchange. Measurements were made of whitecap fraction, wave state, wave bubble statistics and bubble properties beneath breaking waves on the R/V Knorr KN213-3 cruise departing Nuuk, Greenland October 9, 2013 arriving at Woods Hole, USA on November 12, 2013. Instruments and platforms used included an 11 meter long free-floating spar buoy equipped with wave wires, a bubble camera, acoustic resonators, a Waverider buoy and ship measurements of aerosol fluxes. Data generation were funded by NERC parent grant NE/J020893/1 awarded to Professor Ian Brooks and associated child grants NE/J020540/1 and NE/J022373/2 awarded to Mr Robin Pascal and Dr Helen Czerski respectively.

  • This dataset contains particle flux analyses and current measurements collected from sediment traps and associated moored current meter instrumentation. Four McLane sediment traps were deployed in the Iceland Basin (by the Ocean Weather Station India) in a mesoscale array around 60 degrees N 20 degrees W to sample particle flux time series between November 2006 - July 2007 and August 2007 - June 2008. Sediment traps were deployed with Aanderaa RCM8 current meters 15 m below the traps, recording current speed and direction once an hour. The sediment traps were initially deployed during RRS Discovery cruise D312 and recovered on RRS Discovery cruise D321. For the second deployment period the traps were deployed on RRS Discovery cruise D321 and recovered on RRS Discovery cruise D340. The first sediment traps were prepared for analysis by scientists shortly after recovery. The second deployment samples were stored in the dark at 4 degrees Celsius until 2016 and were subsequently analysed. All sediment trap samples are preserved with formalin and hence should not be affected by long time storage. The samples were analysed for mass flux, particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) flux, calcium carbonate flux, biogenic silica flux (including dissolved contribution for deployment 2), strontium flux (including Acantharian cyst fractions for deployment 1 and 2 and particulate fractions for deployment 2). The samples from the latter part of deployment 2 are thought to have severely under collected and so those data are flagged. The dataset was produced for the purposes of calculating sediment fluxes in the Iceland Basin and was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) - Oceans 2025 Programme (Grant number NE/L002531/1).

  • The UK Argo programme data set comprises measurements of ocean temperature and salinity and provides information of surface and subsurface Lagrangian (measuring movement by tracing the path of a passively drifting object) displacement enabling the derivation of currents. The data set includes a mixture of near-real-time (quality controlled to operational ocean forecasting standards) and delayed mode (quality controlled to climate research standards) data collected by profiling floats. The UK floats from part of a global array throughout the world oceans. Real-time data are available within 24 hours of the float surfacing while delayed mode data become available within 12 months of the profile date. Floats drift at their parking depth (between 1000m and 2025m) for 5 or 10 days depending on float programming. Traditionally floats measured temperature and conductivity at regular intervals during their rise to the surface. In October 2007, the Argo programme achieved its goal to have (and maintain) more than 3000 active floats. As of 2012, some newly deployed floats are being programmed to collect data whilst drifting at their parking depth and during their ascent and additional oceanographic parameters, for example fluorescence, optical backscatter, and dissolved oxygen are being trialled for inclusion in the data set. The data has a variety of uses including assimilation into operational weather forecasts in near-real-time to climate research with the delayed mode data. The data set also includes Argo floats deployed by Mauritius, Saudi Arabia (one float in the Red Sea) Ireland and Portugal, as the British Oceanographic Data Centre manages the data from these floats in addition to those of the UK Argo programme.

  • The dataset comprises 28 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area including specifically the Porcupine Sea Bight area. The data were collected during April and May of 1978. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences Wormley Laboratory.

  • This data set consists of a bathymetric grid derived from multibeam bathymetry data from cruise JC071. The bathymetric grid was created by gridding the cleaned raw multibeam data from JC071 at 1/64 arc-minute intervals using a nearneighbour gridding algorithm from the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) software system. The data set covers an approximate one degree square with the minimum and maximum longitude and latitude co-ordinates: 17.016667W-16.216667W; 48.78333N-49.28333N. This is located in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean area. The data were collected from 7th-8th May 2012 using an EM120 Multibeam Echo-sounder. The cruise was part of the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP): sustained ocean observation project. The bathymetry data were collected on an opportunistic basis during the cruise. The cruise was operated by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), equipment operated by National Marine Facilities Sea Systems. The bathymetric grid was created by BODC for contributing to the EMODnet High Resolution Seafloor Mapping (HRSM) Project.

  • The dataset comprises 3 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area specifically west of Portugal and south of Palmer Ridge, from September to November of 1970. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the National Institute of Oceanography.

  • The dataset comprises 17 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area specifically around Cape Verde and to the north east of the Canary Islands. The data were collected from February to April of 1972. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the National Institute of Oceanography.

  • The data set comprises temperature and salinity hydrocasts collected across the North Atlantic Ocean between 1910 and 1990. The measurements were collected by nine North Atlantic Ocean Weather Ships (OWS): OWS Alpha (1954 – 1974); OWS Bravo (1928 – 1974); OWS Charlie (1910 – 1982); OWS Echo (1910 – 1979); OWS India (1957 – 1975); OWS Juliet (1950 – 1975); OWS Kilo (1949 – 1973); OWS Lima (1948 – 1990); OWS Mike (1948 – 1982). This data set also includes measurements collected close to the general positions prior to the stationing of the Weather ships for the OWS Bravo, Charlie and Echo stations. Data from OWS Alpha, Bravo, Echo, India, Juliett and Kilo have been taken from the US National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) compilations whereas those from OWS Charlie, Lima and Mike have been constructed from both the US NODC and International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) data holdings. In addition a daily averaged data set for OWS Charlie is available for the period 1975 - 1985 (supplied by Syd Levitus). This data set was supplied to the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) by ICES. Additional files and more recent data can be acquired from the ICES website.