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  • A possible effect of a carbon dioxide leak from an industrial sub-sea floor storage facility, utilised for Carbon Capture and Storage, is that escaping carbon dioxide gas will dissolve in sediment pore waters and reduce their pH. To quantify the scale and duration of such an impact, a novel, field scale experiment was conducted, whereby carbon dioxide gas was injected into unconsolidated sub-sea floor sediments for a sustained period of 37 days. During this time pore water pH in shallow sediment (5 mm depth) above the leak dropped >0.8 unit, relative to a reference zone that was unaffected by the carbon dioxide. After the gas release was stopped, the pore water pH returned to normal background values within a three-week recovery period. Further, the total mass of carbon dioxide dissolved within the sediment pore fluids above the release zone was modelled by the difference in DIC between the reference and release zones. Results showed that between 14 and 63% of the carbon dioxide released during the experiment could remain in the dissolved phase within the sediment pore water. This is a publication in QICS Special Issue - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Peter Taylor et. al. Doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.09.006.

  • Many of the research results from the SACS and CO2STORE projects are published in the scientific literature but in a somewhat fragmented form. This report consolidates some of the key findings into a manual of observations and recommendations relevant to underground saline aquifer storage, aiming to provide technically robust guidelines for effective and safe storage of CO2 in a range of geological settings. This will set the scene for companies, regulatory authorities, nongovernmental organisations, and ultimately, the interested general public, in evaluating possible new CO2 storage projects in Europe and elsewhere. The report can be downloaded from http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/2959/.

  • It is now generally accepted that anthropogenic CO2 emissions are contributing to the global rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. One possibility for reducing carbon dioxide emissions is to remove it from the flue gases of coal-fired power stations and dispose of it in underground geological reservoirs, possibly offshore in the North Sea. The feasibility of this option has been studied in detail by a consortium of European partners. As part of this study, natural occurrences of carbon dioxide were identified and preliminary information from these was obtained. The best characterised are found in the United States where the carbon dioxide reserves are exploited for use in tertiary enhanced oil recovery (EOR) programs in the Texas oilfields. The carbon dioxide reserves occur in geological structures and lithologies which are similar to those present in the North Sea. As such, these fields offer an ideal natural analogue for the disposal of carbon dioxide, since the interactions with groundwaters and reservoir lithologies have occurred on both spatial and temporal scales relevant to geological processes. Those carbon dioxide fields currently being exploited have already been studied to a limited extent by the oil companies involved. However, further study is required to provide information on the potential effects that disposing of large quantities of carbon dioxide might have on groundwaters and reservoir quality. In addition, more detailed information will be obtained on the interactions which occur during EOR using carbon dioxide. This paper presents data on some of the natural carbon dioxide fields, and compares the effects of these natural fluid-rock interactions with those observed in laboratory experiments performed to establish what reactions occur during the geological disposal of carbon dioxide. doi:10.1016/0196-8904(95)00309-6. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0196890495003096.

  • The mechanical data (confining and injection pressures) recorded during Vickers indentation experiments on samples of shale materials. These experiments were conducted on the I12 beamline, Diamond Light Source, Harwell as part of beamtime EE17606-1 between 31/01/18 and 05/02/18.

  • This poster was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-14. The data consists of a poster presented at the UKCCSRC biannual meeting in Cranfield, April 20th 2015. The poster describes an overview of work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. Three main work strands are briefly described: 1) The Captain Sandstone aquifer is studied for the geomechanical integrity of faults, 2) Shallow gas accumulations in the Netherlands sector of the Southern North Sea provide an opportunity to study their coincidence with faulting while commonalities in the nature of the faults provide an indication of factors that might lead to fault leakage in CO2 storage sites. 3) The Fizzy gas field which is naturally rich in CO2 is studied for its fault seal potential as a natural analogue for fault-bounded storage sites.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Determination of water solubility limits in CO2 mixtures to deliver water specification levels for CO2 transportation was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-21. Studies of the phase behaviour and water solubility of pure and impure CO2 are of great relevance to the transport phase of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) process. For transport through carbon steel pipelines, CO2 and any impurities present must be present as a single phase to avoid corrosion, and subsequent loss of pipeline integrity. Trace impurities such as H2 and N2 have been shown to alter the phase behaviour of the CO2 at high pressure. Understanding the effect of these impurities on the solubility of H2O in CO2 is vital to confirm the safety and viability of CO2 transport through carbon steel pipelines.

  • This dataset comprises a series of six .xls workbooks which contain the data auxiliary material for the manuscript "Metrology and Traceability of U-Pb Isotope Dilution Geochronology (EARTHTIME Tracer Calibration Part I)" by Daniel Condon, Blair Schoene, Noah McLean, Samuel Bowring and Randall Parrish, submitted to Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (June 2014). These data comprise the input measurement data for the EARTHTIME U-Pb Tracer Calibration experiment, the results of which are documented in the manuscript mentioned above. This data set contains isotope ratio data for the manuscript listed above. ts01.xls Amelin and Davis (2006) Pb reference material isotope ratio data ts02.xls CRM 115 U isotope ratio data ts03.xls Gravimetric-Tracer mixture isotope ratio data ts04.xls GDMS elemental concentration data ts05.xls Tracer-blank Pb isotope ratio data ts06.xls U critical mixture isotope ratio data. Link to Published Paper - Metrology and Traceability of U-Pb Isotope Dilution Geochronology (EARTHTIME Tracer Calibration Part I) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2015.05.026

  • Data and associated papers. Ocean acidification and the Permo-Triassic mass extinction. Ediacaran metazoan reefs from the Nama Group, Namibia. NERC Grant Re-inventing the planet: The Neoproterozoic revolution in oxygenation, biogeochemistry and biological complexity.

  • Dupont, Valerie (2016) Data for "Kinetics study and modelling of steam methane reforming process over a NiO/Al2O3 catalyst in an adiabatic packed bed reactor" in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. University of Leeds. Data file containing datasets used to generate the figures and tables in the paper. [Dataset] https://doi.org/10.5518/126. [Publication] http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2016.11.093

  • The data consists of a short project update for the 2015/16 annual report and the final report for the project. The update describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The report details the latter stages of the project, the final conclusions and results dissemination throughout the project.